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Worksheet: Acid–Base Titrations

Q1:

Which of the following statements about the equivalence point of an acid-base titration is true?

  • A The equivalence point of an acid-base titration is where the pH = 7.0 (neutral).
  • B The equivalence point of an acid-base titration is the same as the indicator endpoint.
  • C The equivalence point of an acid-base titration is where the entire volume of the buret has been used.
  • DThe equivalence point of an acid-base titration is the point where there is an equivalent amount of titrant and titrand.
  • E The equivalence point of an acid-base titration is the average value of the dissociation constants.

Q2:

In an acid-base titration, a 75.0 mL sample of a calcium hydroxide solution requires 36.6 mL of 50.0 mM hydrochloric acid to react completely. Calculate the molarity of the calcium hydroxide solution.

Q3:

Oxalic acid ( C O H ) 2 4 2 reacts with aqueous sodium hydroxide to produce sodium oxalate and water: Calculate the volume of a 0.3300 M sodium hydroxide solution needed to titrate 15.00 mL of 0.1500 M oxalic acid.

Q4:

Potassium hydroxide reacts with dilute aqueous phosphoric acid to produce potassium hydrogen phosphate: Calculate the volume of a 0.1500 M solution of potassium hydroxide needed to titrate 40.00 mL of 0.06560 M aqueous phosphoric acid.

Q5:

Why should a standard sodium hydroxide solution be titrated against a standard acid solution before use as a titrant?

  • AThe solution reacts with atmospheric oxygen when stored under air.
  • BThe solution evaporates when stored under air.
  • CSodium hydroxide precipitates over time.
  • DThe solution reacts with atmospheric carbon dioxide when stored under air.
  • ESodium hydroxide reacts in water over time.

Q6:

Titration of a 50.0 mL sample of hydrochloric acid required 35.23 mL of 0.250 M aqueous sodium hydroxide. Calculate the concentration of the hydrochloric acid.

Q7:

Titration of a 20.0 mL aqueous solution of sulfuric acid required 1.70 mL of 0.0811 M aqueous sodium hydroxide. Calculate the concentration of sulfuric acid in the sample.

  • A 6.24 mM
  • B 3.12 mM
  • C 1.56 mM
  • D 3.45 mM
  • E 6.90 mM

Q8:

Calculate the volume of 0.600 M hydrochloric acid needed to react completely with 2.50 g of sodium hydrogen carbonate.

  • A 58.3 mL
  • B 78.6 mL
  • C 52.1 mL
  • D 49.6 mL
  • E 43.3 mL

Q9:

A solution contains 40.0% of acetic acid by mass and has a density of 1.052 g/mL. What mass of calcium hydroxide is needed to neutralize 23.5 mL of this solution?

Q10:

Calculate the volume of 0.0150 M hydrochloric acid needed to titrate 150 mL of 0.0200 M aqueous calcium hydroxide.

  • A 225 mL
  • B 200 mL
  • C 113 mL
  • D 400 mL
  • E 450 mL

Q11:

Potassium hydroxide reacts with dilute sulfuric acid to produce aqueous potassium sulfate and water: Calculate the volume of an 8.83 mM solution of potassium hydroxide needed to react completely with 40.00 mL of 0.111 mM sulfuric acid.

Q12:

Nitric acid reacts with potassium hydrogen phosphate to produce potassium nitrate and phosphoric acid: Calculate, to 3 significant figures, the volume of 0.09992 M nitric acid needed to react completely with 0.3242 g of potassium hydrogen phosphate.

Q13:

Potassium acid phthalate ( K H C H O ) 8 4 4 reacts with sodium hydroxide to form potassium sodium phthalate: A 0.2500 g sample of potassium acid phthalate requires 25.45 mL of a standard sodium hydroxide solution to react completely. Calculate the concentration of this solution, to 3 significant figures.

Q14:

When using phenolphthalein as an indicator in acid–base titrations, why is it better to use the base as the titrant?

  • APhenolphthalein degrades more slowly in acid.
  • BThe base solution degrades more slowly when stored in a buret.
  • CPhenolphthalein precipitates in base.
  • DA color change from colorless to pink is more easily detected than decolorization.
  • EThe color change occurs more rapidly at low pH.