Worksheet: Active Transport

In this worksheet, we will practice describing the process of active transport, and giving examples of substances being actively transported.

Q1:

What biological process produces the energy required for active transport?

  • ABreathing
  • BPhotosynthesis
  • CRespiration
  • DExercising
  • EDecomposition

Q2:

Which of the following statements best describes transport between soil and root hair cells?

  • ARoot hair cells take in water by osmosis and mineral ions by active transport.
  • BRoot hair cells take in water and mineral ions by diffusion.
  • CRoot hair cells take in water by diffusion and mineral ions by active transport.
  • DRoot hair cells take in water and mineral ions by active transport.
  • ERoot hair cells take in water by osmosis and mineral ions by diffusion.

Q3:

Which of the following statements does not apply to active transport?

  • AIt moves substances against their concentration gradient.
  • BIt is a passive process.
  • CIt moves substances from a low to a high concentration.
  • DIt occurs across cell membranes.
  • EIt requires energy (ATP).

Q4:

Which of the following statements about the transport of substances is not correct?

  • ADiffusion and osmosis move substances down their concentration gradient.
  • BDiffusion requires carrier proteins.
  • CDiffusion and osmosis are passive processes.
  • DOsmosis happens across a partially permeable membrane.
  • EActive transport requires energy.

Q5:

How do carrier proteins help actively transport substances across cell membranes?

  • ACarrier proteins bend the cell membrane to fit around substances.
  • BCarrier proteins bind substances using hydrogen bonds.
  • CCarrier proteins make gaps in the membrane so substances can diffuse through.
  • DCarrier proteins use energy to change shape and carry substances across a cell membrane.
  • ECarrier proteins dissolve substances so they can pass through a cell membrane by osmosis.

Q6:

In the human body, the concentration of glucose can be higher in the blood than it is in the small intestines. Why is active transport beneficial here?

  • AGlucose is insoluble, and left in the intestines, it will cause blockages.
  • BGlucose can be moved into the small intestines down the concentration gradient and used by respiring cells.
  • CGlucose can become toxic if too much is left in the intestines.
  • DGlucose can be moved into the blood against the concentration gradient and taken to respiring muscles.

Q7:

Which of the diagrams given best represents the movement of particles in active transport?

  • AD
  • BB
  • CC
  • DA

Q8:

The diagram provided shows a simplified outline of how a molecule can be actively transported across a cell membrane. What structure is represented by the label X?

  • AThe cell membrane
  • BA carrier protein
  • CAn ATP molecule
  • DAn enzyme

Q9:

The diagram provided shows a simplified outline of how a molecule can be actively transported across a cell membrane. Which of the following best explains the role of the carrier protein?

  • AIn active transport, carrier proteins provide gaps in the membrane to allow water molecules to move in and out of the cell by osmosis.
  • BIn active transport, carrier proteins bind to target substances and alter the shape of the substance before releasing it on the other side of the membrane.
  • CIn active transport, substances move down their concentration gradient through the center of a carrier protein.
  • DIn active transport, carrier proteins bind to target substances then use energy in the form of ATP to change shape and transport the substances to the other side of the membrane.

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