Worksheet: Active Transport

In this worksheet, we will practice describing the process of active transport, and giving examples of substances being actively transported.

Q1:

What biological process produces the energy required for active transport?

  • AExercising
  • BDecomposition
  • CRespiration
  • DBreathing
  • EPhotosynthesis

Q2:

Which of the following statements best describes transport between soil and root hair cells?

  • ARoot hair cells take in water by osmosis and mineral ions by diffusion.
  • BRoot hair cells take in water and mineral ions by active transport.
  • CRoot hair cells take in water and mineral ions by diffusion.
  • DRoot hair cells take in water by osmosis and mineral ions by active transport.
  • ERoot hair cells take in water by diffusion and mineral ions by active transport.

Q3:

Which of the following statements does not apply to active transport?

  • AIt occurs across cell membranes.
  • BIt is a passive process.
  • CIt moves substances against their concentration gradient.
  • DIt moves substances from a low to a high concentration.
  • EIt requires energy (ATP).

Q4:

Which of the following statements about the transport of substances is not correct?

  • AActive transport requires energy.
  • BOsmosis happens across a partially permeable membrane.
  • CDiffusion and osmosis move substances down their concentration gradient.
  • DDiffusion requires carrier proteins.
  • EDiffusion and osmosis are passive processes.

Q5:

How do carrier proteins help actively transport substances across cell membranes?

  • ACarrier proteins dissolve substances so they can pass through a cell membrane by osmosis.
  • BCarrier proteins use energy to change shape and carry substances across a cell membrane.
  • CCarrier proteins bend the cell membrane to fit around substances.
  • DCarrier proteins make gaps in the membrane so substances can diffuse through.
  • ECarrier proteins bind substances using hydrogen bonds.

Q6:

In the human body, the concentration of glucose can be higher in the blood than it is in the small intestines. Why is active transport beneficial here?

  • AGlucose can be moved into the small intestines down the concentration gradient and used by respiring cells.
  • BGlucose is insoluble, and left in the intestines, it will cause blockages.
  • CGlucose can be moved into the blood against the concentration gradient and taken to respiring muscles.
  • DGlucose can become toxic if too much is left in the intestines.

Q7:

Which of the diagrams given best represents the movement of particles in active transport?