Worksheet: Effect of Intermolecular Forces on Solubility

In this worksheet, we will practice explaining trends in solubility based on the changes in intermolecular forces when dissolution takes place.

Q1:

What is the strongest intermolecular force in a solution of NO()l in CO()l?

  • AIonic bonding
  • BHydrogen bonding
  • CDipole–dipole
  • DDipole-induced dipole
  • EDispersion

Q2:

A potential difference is applied to a piece of magnesium metal, as shown in the diagram.

Which electrode, if any, will the electrons move toward?

  • AThe electrons will remain stationary.
  • BNegative electrode
  • CPositive electrode

Which electrode, if any, will the metal ions move toward?

  • AThe metal ions will remain stationary.
  • BNegative electrode
  • CPositive electrode

Q3:

The figure shows molecules of water interacting with a crystal of potassium chloride, and the ions it is composed of.

What property of water allows it to interact so strongly with both anions and cations?

  • AOxygen in water is electron-deficient, while the hydrogens are electron-rich.
  • BWater molecules are small, allowing many of them to cluster around a single ion.
  • CIt is highly reactive, because water contains hydrogen.
  • DWater molecules have large, permanent dipoles.

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