Lesson Video: Modeling and Counting 10 Mathematics • Kindergarten

In this video, we will learn how to represent one object by another to help us count 10 objects.

10:52

Video Transcript

Modeling and Counting 10

In this video, we will learn how to represent one object by another to help us count 10 objects. When we’re counting groups of objects, it’s easy to lose our place. One, two, three, four, five, six. Oh dear, I’ve forgotten which ones I’ve counted. Can you think of a better way to count the dinosaurs? A way to make counting easier would be to place the dinosaurs in a line. This makes it much easier to keep track of which dinosaur we’ve counted. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10.

We can also use maths equipment to help us, like counters or blocks. Each time we count a dinosaur, we can place a counter. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10. We used a counter to represent each dinosaur. This makes counting a lot easier. In this video, we’re going to learn how to use equipment, like counters or blocks, to help us count 10 objects. Let’s practice counting with some questions.

Count the rats. Find a piece of cheese for every rat.

In this question, we’re shown some rats. And we’re asked to find a piece of cheese for every rat. This question is asking us to match the number of rats with the same number of pieces of cheese. First, we’re going to need to count the number of rats. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10. If there are 10 rats, then we need 10 pieces of cheese.

Which of our three groups have 10 pieces of cheese? To help us find a piece of cheese for each rat, we could place the rats in a line. Then, we can try and match a piece of cheese to each rat. Let’s start with the first group. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight. We don’t have a piece of cheese for every rat.

Let’s try the second group. If we give a piece of cheese to each rat like before, we can see that there are not enough pieces in this group. One rat doesn’t have a piece of cheese. If there are 10 rats and one rat doesn’t have a piece of cheese, how many pieces of cheese are there? One less than 10 is nine.

We’re looking for 10 pieces of cheese because there are 10 rats. So, this must be the group that has 10 pieces of cheese. Let’s check. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10. This is the group that has 10 pieces of cheese. We found a piece of cheese for every rat. There are 10 rats and 10 pieces of cheese.

Count the oranges. Color a square as you count each orange.

In this question, we’re shown a group of oranges. We’re told that we have to count them. And as we count each orange, we have to color a square. Once we’ve counted the oranges and colored the squares here, then we can select the picture which shows the same number of squares that we’ve colored.

So, let’s count the oranges and each time we count, color a square. Here’s one orange, so we needed to color one square. Two oranges, we’ve colored two squares, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10. We counted 10 oranges and we colored 10 squares.

Which of the pictures shows 10 squares? It’s this one. All of the squares are colored. It shows 10 squares to represent our 10 oranges.

Count the hats. Use the counters to show how many hats there are.

In this question, we’re given a picture of some hats. And we’re told that we have to use counters to show how many hats there are. We have to select the group of counters that has the same number as the number of hats. Let’s start by counting the hats. Let’s use a counter each time we count a hat. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10.

Which of our groups has 10 counters? We know there are 10 hats, so we need the group with 10 counters. Does this group have 10 counters? One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10. Each hat has a counter. This is the correct group of counters. It shows how many hats there are. There are 10 counters and 10 hats.

Count the snowmen in the picture. Use blocks to show how many there are.

In this question, we’re shown a group of snowmen. We’re asked to count the snowmen and then use blocks to show how many there are. In this question, we’re asked to pick the group of blocks which has the same number as the number of snowmen. Each time we count a snowman, we could place a block.

One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10. We counted 10 snowmen and we used a block to show each snowman. We have 10 snowmen and 10 blocks. Which of our three pictures shows 10 blocks? It’s this one. It has 10 blocks. We counted the snowmen in the picture and used blocks to show how many there are. There are 10 snowmen.

Count the presents. Put counters into a ten frame as you count.

We’re shown a group of presents. And we’re told we have to count them. We’re also told to put counters into a ten frame as we count the presents. Here’s our ten frame. Let’s count. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10. We counted the presents and put a counter into the ten frame as we counted. Our ten frame is full. It has 10 counters.

Which of our three ten frames shows 10 counters? It’s this one. This ten frame is full. That means it contains 10 counters. We counted the presents and put counters into a ten frame as we counted. There are 10 presents and 10 counters.

What have we learned in this video? We’ve learned how to represent one object by another to help us count 10 objects.

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