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Video: Solving One-Variable Equations Embedded in a Real-Life Context

Tim Burnham

Raymond went to the supermarket and bought a bar of chocolate for $3.03. When he returned home, he found he had $4.61 left. Write an equation to find how much money Raymond had before going to the supermarket, and then solve it.

01:49

Video Transcript

Raymond went to the supermarket and bought a bar of chocolate for three dollars and three cents. When he returned home, he found he had four dollars and sixty-one cents left. Write an equation to find how much money Raymond had before going to the supermarket, and then solve it.

Well first off, letโ€™s define a variable called ๐‘š which represents the amount of money in dollars that Raymond had before going to the supermarket. So he started off with ๐‘š dollars, he then spent three dollars and three cents, and he was left with four dollars and sixty-one cents.

So we can write that down. Weโ€™ve started off with ๐‘š dollars and then we took away three point o three dollars, three dollars and three cents. And that left us with four point six one dollars, four dollars and sixty-one cents. So weโ€™ve done the first part of the question; we have written our equation. Now we need to go on and rearrange and solve that equation to find out how much money Raymond had before he went to the supermarket.

Now I want to know what ๐‘š is. So if I add three point o three to both sides of my equation, then on the left-hand side Iโ€™ve got ๐‘š minus three dollars and three cents plus three dollars and three cents; these two numbers here are gonna cancel out, which just leaves me with ๐‘š. And on the right hand side, Iโ€™ve got four dollars and sixty-one plus three dollars and three, which is seven dollars and sixty-four cents.

So there we have our answer: Raymond had seven dollars and sixty-four cents before going to the supermarket.