Video: Calculating the Number of Electrons Present in a Transfer of Charge

In an electric storm, a lightning bolt transfers electrons between some clouds and the ground. The total charge of these electrons is 65.0 C. How many electrons are transferred?

00:48

Video Transcript

In an electric storm, a lightning bolt transfers electrons between some clouds and the ground. The total charge of these electrons is 65.0 coulombs. How many electrons are transferred?

We can say that the number of electrons that are transferred is equal to the total charge that’s transferred divided by the charge of a single electron. We’re given the total charge that moves 65.0 coulombs. And we can look up the charge on an individual electron. It’s negative 1.60 times 10 to the negative 19ths coulombs.

In our denominator, we’ll use the magnitude of the charge of a single electron. So our answer for the total number of electrons is positive. When we calculate this fraction to three significant figures, we find it’s 4.06 times 10 to the 20ths. That’s the number of electrons that are transferred.

Nagwa uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn more about our Privacy Policy.