Question Video: Estimating the Suitable Time Unit for an Action Mathematics

James can stay under the water for 1 _. [A] Hour [B] Minute

02:02

Video Transcript

James can stay under the water for one what. One hour or one minute?

You know, in maths, whenever we measure something, whether it’s how tall something is or how heavy or like in this question how long something takes, we don’t just give a number. We have to also have a unit of measurement. So in other words, we can’t just say James can stay under water for one because it doesn’t make sense. We’d want to say one what. And that’s why this question is all about choosing the right unit of measurement to finish off our sentence.

Can james stay under the water for one hour or one minute? Now, it doesn’t really matter whether we know James at all. This question is all about thinking about which one of these units of measurement makes most sense. To help us, let’s think about how long an hour is and how long a minute is. What do we know about an hour? One hour is the length of time it takes the minute hand on a clock face to go all the way around once. You can think of all the things you can get done in one lesson at school. That’s about an hour long. In fact, we could use this to help us. Because if we can imagine that James is having a swimming lesson, do you think he can stay under the water for the whole swimming lesson? I don’t think so, do you?

Now, we know that one minute is the length of time it takes the minute hand on a clock face to move one little notch. It’s the same as 60 seconds. So if we counted from one to 60, that’s about a minute. So which of these units of measurement makes most sense? Do you think James can stay under the water for a whole swimming lesson or for the length of time it takes to count from one to 60? I think it’s the second answer, don’t you? James can stay under the water for one minute.

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