Video: GCSE Mathematics Foundation Tier Pack 1 β€’ Paper 3 β€’ Question 17

GCSE Mathematics Foundation Tier Pack 1 β€’ Paper 3 β€’ Question 17

04:42

Video Transcript

In the diagram, 𝐴𝐡𝐷𝐸𝐹 is a pentagon and 𝐡𝐢𝐷 is a triangle. 𝐴𝐡𝐢 and 𝐢𝐷𝐸 are straight lines. The lengths 𝐡𝐢 and 𝐢𝐷 are the same. Part a) Find the size of angle π‘₯. Give a reason for your answer. Part b) Calculate the size of angle 𝑦.

We’re told in the question that the lengths 𝐡𝐢 and 𝐢𝐷 are equal. This means that triangle 𝐡𝐢𝐷 is an isosceles triangle, as any triangle with two equal length sides is isosceles. An isosceles triangle also has two equal angles. In this case, angle 𝐷𝐡𝐢 is equal to angle 𝐢𝐷𝐡.

We know from the diagram that angle 𝐢𝐷𝐡 was equal to 70 degrees. Therefore, angle 𝐷𝐡𝐢 must also be equal to 70 degrees. As this angle was labelled π‘₯, we can say that π‘₯ is equal to 70 degrees because triangle 𝐡𝐢𝐷 was isosceles.

The second part of our question asked us to calculate the size of angle 𝑦. In order to do this, we firstly need to calculate angles 𝐴𝐡𝐷 and 𝐡𝐷𝐸. We’re told in the question that 𝐴𝐡𝐢 and 𝐢𝐷𝐸 are straight lines. We also know that angles on a straight line sum or add up to 180 degrees.

This means that 70 plus angle 𝐴𝐡𝐷 must equal 180. Subtracting 70 from both sides of this equation gives us a value for angle 𝐴𝐡𝐷 of 110 degrees. We can use the same method to calculate the value of angle 𝐡𝐷𝐸. 70 plus angle 𝐡𝐷𝐸 equals 180. Once again, subtracting 70 from both sides of this equation gives us a value for angle 𝐡𝐷𝐸 of 110 degrees.

We now need to consider the pentagon 𝐴𝐡𝐷𝐸𝐹 to help us calculate the size of angle 𝑦. Angles in a pentagon sum or add up to 540 degrees. We can prove this by splitting any pentagon into the minimum number of triangles.

The least number of triangles a pentagon can be split into is three. And we know that angles in a triangle add up to 180 degrees. 180 multiplied by three is equal to 540. Therefore, the angles in a pentagon add up to 540 degrees.

We can use this same method to calculate the sum of the interior angles of any polygon. We can split a hexagon into four triangles. Therefore, the angles in a hexagon would add up to 180 multiplied by four. This is equal to 720 degrees.

If in an exam, you’ve forgotten what the angles in any polygon add up to, it is worth doing a little diagram as we have done here. As the five angles in the pentagon add up to 540, we can write the following equation: 𝑦 plus 𝑦 plus 110 plus 110 plus 90 is equal to 540.

Simplifying the equation by grouping like terms gives us two 𝑦 plus 310 equals 540 as 𝑦 plus 𝑦 is equal to two 𝑦 and 110 plus 110 plus 90 is equal to 310. Subtracting 310 from both sides of this equation gives us two 𝑦 is equal to 230 as 540 minus 310 is equal to 230. Finally, dividing both sides of this equation by two gives us a value for 𝑦 of 115 degrees. 230 divided by two is equal to 115.

We can check this answer by adding the five angles: 115 plus 115 plus 110 plus 110 plus 90 is equal to 540.

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