Lesson Video: Multiplying by 10 | Nagwa Lesson Video: Multiplying by 10 | Nagwa

Lesson Video: Multiplying by 10 Mathematics • 3rd Grade

In this video, we will learn how to model multiplication by 10 and recite the 10 times table up to 100.

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Video Transcript

Multiplying by 10

In this video, we will learn how to model multiplication by 10 and recite the 10 times table.

One of the best ways to learn the 10 times table is to practice reciting it. Let’s go. We can use the counting strip to help. One times 10 is 10. Two 10s are 20. Three 10s are 30. Four 10s are 40. Five 10s are 50. Six times 10 is 60. Seven 10s are 70. Eight 10s are 80. Nine 10s are 90. And 10 times 10 is 100.

We can also model the 10 times table or multiplying by 10 using maths equipment like this 10s block. We call it a 10s block because it contains 10 blocks. We’ve got one group of 10, which is 10. One times 10 equals 10. Two times 10 is 20. Three multiplied by 10 is 30, 10, 20, 30. Four times 10 is 40. And we can keep on multiplying by 10 in this way all the way up to 10 times 10. 10 10s are 100.

When we reach 10 10s, we can swap them for a 100s block. And to find 11 times 10, we just need to add another 10s block. 11 10s are 110, and 12 10s are 120.

We’ve learned lots of different ways to help us multiply by 10. One way is to use our 10 times table facts. And we practiced reciting the 10 times table. We also learned how to multiply by 10 by counting forward in 10s along a number track. We also used place value equipment to help us count in 10s. We can use 100s blocks and 10s blocks to help us model the 10 times table. We’ve also learned that we can multiply by 10 using a number line. Let’s practice the strategies we’ve learned from multiplying by 10 with some practice questions now.

To calculate two times 10, Amelia counted by 10 two times and got 20. Follow Amelia’s method of counting by 10 to calculate 10 times 10.

In this question, we have to calculate 10 multiplied by 10. And we’re told to use Amelia’s method. Amelia counted by 10 two times and got 20. So if we’re going to use Amelia’s method, we need to count by 10. We need to count by 10 10 times because we’re multiplying 10 by 10. So we know that two times 10 is 20. We have to calculate 10 times 10. We don’t need to start from zero because we already know that two times 10 is 20. We just need to keep skip counting by 10 until we reach 10 times 10. Three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10. 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100. 10 multiplied by 10 equals 100.

We calculated our answer using Amelia’s method of skip counting by 10. We skip counted by 10 10 times until we reached 100.

Complete. 10 multiplied by four equals what.

In this question, we have to multiply 10 by four. We could also write this as four times 10. When we’re multiplying by 10, we can use a number line to help. This number line goes up in 10s. 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, and so on. To find four lots of 10, we could skip count by 10. One times 10 is 10. Two times 10 is 20. Three times 10 is 30. And four times 10 is 40. 10, 20, 30, 40. We skip counted by 10 four times. 10 times four or four times 10 is 40.

Complete the missing data in the following table.

In this question, we’re shown a table. And we’re told that some of the information is missing. This is a multiplication table. We have to multiply the numbers on the top row by 10 and write the answer in the bottom row. Seven multiplied by 10 is 70. We have to find eight times 10. And the row that comes after eight times 10 is nine times 10, which is 90.

We could use these multiplication facts to help us find the missing number. In other words, we could use the fact that seven times 10 is 70 to help us find eight times 10. We could also use the fact that nine times 10 is 90 to help us find eight times 10. If we add 10 to 70, we’ll have eight 10s instead of seven. And we know that 70 plus 10 is 80. 90 take away 10 is also 80. Nine 10s are 90, so eight 10s are one less 10 than 90. 90 take away 10 is 80.

The missing number in the table is 80. We found the answer using the facts we were already given. Eight times 10 equals 80.

If you know that two times 10 equals 20, find four times 10.

In this question, we’re told to use one fact to help us find another. The fact we’re given is two times 10 equals 20. And we have to find four times 10. We’re multiplying both numbers two and four by 10. How can we use two times 10 to help us find four times 10? Four is double two. To get from two to four, we need to multiply two by two. Doubling is the same as multiplying by two. So to find the answer to four times 10, we need to double 20. Double 20 is 40. Two 10s are 20. Four 10s are 40.

We used the fact that two times 10 is 20 to help us find four times 10. We used our knowledge of doubling to help. Four times 10 is 40.

Complete. What times 10 equals 100.

In this question, we have to find the missing number. What number multiplied by 10 gives us 100. We could use our knowledge of the 10 times table to help us find the missing number. We know that one times 10 is 10. Two 10s are 20. Three 10s are 30. Four 10s are 40. Five 10s are 50. Six 10s are 60. Seven 10s are 70. Eight 10s are 80. Nine 10s are 90. And 10 10s are 100.

The missing number is 10. 10 times 10 equals 100. We found the missing number using our knowledge of the 10 times table.

What have we learned in this video? We have learned how to use different methods to multiply by 10. We’ve learned how to use models such as place value blocks, counting strips or number tracks, a number line. And we also used our knowledge of the 10 times table to help us multiply by 10.

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