Video: KS1-M17 • Paper 2 • Question 10

20 children chose their favourite fruit juice. The chart shows their results. How many more children chose orange than apple? b) Another boy joined the group. He chose mango juice. Add this information to the chart.

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Video Transcript

20 children chose their favourite fruit juice. The chart shows their results. And we’re asked two questions based on the chart. How many more children chose orange than apple? And then part b). Another boy joined the group. He chose mango juice. Add this information to the chart.

The first thing we need to do is look at all the information we’ve been given. We’re told that 20 children chose their favourite fruit juice. And if we look at the bottom of our chart, we can see the three flavours of fruit juice that they had to choose from: apple, orange, and mango. And at the side of the graph, we can see the number of children that are labelled. And this scale goes from zero to 10.

Before we start answering the question, notice that the scale goes up in ones: one, two, three, and so on. In other words, each block on the chart is worth one child. So it’s important to look at the scale on a chart. It could be that the scale goes up in twos: two, four, six, and so on. And then each block would be worth two children. And this would change how we answer the question. But with this graph, the scale goes up in ones. So each block is worth one child.

Part a) asks us how many more children chose orange than apple. We can see straight away that orange is the most popular fruit juice in the group because the bar that shows orange is the tallest. But how high is the bar that shows orange juice? One way to find the answer is to use a ruler and to read across to the scale to see what number it’s the same as. 10 children chose orange juice. How many children chose apple juice? This time, the bar is a lot nearer to the scale. So we can see how high it is. But we could still use a ruler just to check. Four children chose apple juice. So if 10 children chose orange juice and four children chose apple juice, how many more children chose orange than apple?

We need to find the difference between 10 and four. We could do this in our heads. 10 take away four equals six. Another way to find the answer would be to count up from four to 10. How many more would we need to add to the bar that shows apple before it was as large as the bar that shows orange? One, two, three. You can see what we’re doing is we’re adding more blocks on to the four that we had to start with. Three plus four equals seven. And that’s why we’ve got as high as seven. We need to get up to 10: four, five, six. Four plus six equals 10. Six more children chose orange juice than apple juice.

Let’s remind ourselves what part b) says. Another boy joined the group. He chose mango juice. Add this information to the chart.

Because the boy chose mango juice, we need to make the bar that shows mango juice taller. And it needs to be taller by one more. We’ve said already that the scale shows that each block is worth one more child. So we need to draw one more block. Normally, we’d probably use exactly the same colour. But because this video is trying to show how to answer the question, let’s show it stripy.

So we can see this is the block we’ve added. If we read across, we can see that six children like mango juice to start with. But one more boy chose mango juice as his favourite. So that number became seven. So we found that six more children chose orange than apple. And because another boy joined and chose mango juice, we needed to draw another block onto the bar that shows mango. So to get the right answer, that bar should now be seven children high.

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