Video: Determining the Certain, Likely, Unlikely, or Impossible Events in an Experiment Involving Spinners

If this spinner is spun once, is it certain, likely, unlikely, or impossible that the pointer stops on the number 5 or 6?

02:28

Video Transcript

If this spinner is spun once, is it certain, likely, unlikely, or impossible that the pointer stops on the number five or six?

The first thing we want to do is find the numbers five or six on the spinner. We see there’s one number six and one number five. That means there are two chances it would land on five or six. We also need to find the chances that it would not land on five or six.

Let’s shade in green anything that would not be five or six. The nine is already green. The next nine is also not five or six. The four is not five or six. The three is not a five or a six. The eight was already coloured in green. It is not five or six. And finally, the one is not a five or a six. And that means there are six chances that the spinner does not land on five or six, two chances that it does land on five or six, six chances that it doesn’t land on five or six.

We have to take this information and choose a phrase. Our choices are certain, likely, unlikely, or impossible. You cannot be certain that the spinner will land on five or six because there are other options. It’s also not impossible because there is a five and a six on the board. We now need to choose from likely or unlikely. Two chances compared to six chances means that it’s unlikely to land on a five or six. There is a higher chance that it’s not five or six.

It is unlikely if the spinner is spun that it will stop on a five or six.

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