Video: GCSE Mathematics Foundation Tier Pack 3 • Paper 1 • Question 4

GCSE Mathematics Foundation Tier Pack 3 • Paper 1 • Question 4

02:41

Video Transcript

Sarah gets paid per hour. She works eight hours and gets paid 48 pounds. How much would she get paid for 10 hours of work?

So in this question, we’ve been told the amount that Sarah gets paid for eight hours of work. And we want to know how much she’ll get paid for 10 hours. We also know that Sarah gets paid per hour, which means she has a fixed hourly rate. We need to work this out so that we can then work out what she’ll be paid for 10 hours.

So this is what we’re going to do. We’re going to take the amount that Sarah got paid for eight hours. And we’re first going to scale it down to see what she’d get paid for one hour. We can then scale this number up to work out what she’d be paid for 10 hours.

To scale down from eight hours to one hour, we need to divide by eight. So we also need to divide the amount she gets paid by eight. 48 divided by eight is six. That’s one of our times tables. That eight multiplied by six is 48. So this means that Sarah gets paid six pounds for every hour that she works.

Next, we need to scale up from Sarah’s hourly rate to work out what she’d be paid for 10 hours. To scale up from one hour to 10 hours, we have to multiply by 10. So we’ll also need to do the same to her hourly rate. Six multiplied by 10 is equal to 60. So this means that Sarah will be paid 60 pounds for 10 hours of work.

Now, there are actually other approaches that we could take to this scaling. As eight and 10 are both even numbers, we could instead work out what Sarah gets paid for two hours. To scale down from eight hours to two hours, we need to divide by four. So we’d also need to divide her pay of 48 pounds by four, which would tell us that for every two hours Sarah works, she gets paid 12 pounds.

We then have a choice for how to work out what she’ll be paid for 10 hours of work. Firstly, we could scale up from two hours to 10 hours by multiplying by five. Multiplying 12 pounds by five would give 60 pounds, the same as the answer we’ve already found.

The other method would be to add together the amount that we found for two hours work to the amount that we know for eight hours work as eight plus two gives 10. So we’d have 48 pounds for the eight hours plus 12 pounds for the two hours, giving a total of 60 pounds.

All three methods give the same answer: the amount that Sarah gets paid for 10 hours of work is 60 pounds.

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