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Question Video: Describing How Susbtances Pass Between the Nucleus and the Cell Cytoplasm Biology

How do substances pass between the inside of the nucleus and the surrounding cell cytoplasm? [A] Through nuclear pores [B] Through gaps in the nucleus wall [C] Through the nuclear stomata [D] Via nuclear transport tissues

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Video Transcript

How do substances pass between the inside of the nucleus and the surrounding cell cytoplasm? (A) Through nuclear pores, (B) through gaps in the nucleus wall, (C) through the nuclear stomata, or (D) via nuclear transport tissues.

The nucleus is a membrane-bound organelle which contains the majority of a eukaryotic cell’s genetic material in the form of DNA. Its function is to protect DNA from the reactions that occur in the cytoplasm, and it does this using its membrane, which is called the nuclear envelope. However, some material must pass between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in order to give the cell essential instructions. So how does this happen? The nuclear envelope contains small openings called nuclear pores, which some molecules can pass through. Chromosomes are unable to pass through the nuclear pores because they’re too large. mRNA molecules, on the other hand, are much smaller, and therefore they can pass through easily.

Thanks to nuclear pores, mRNA can pass from the nucleus into the cytoplasm where it can meet a ribosome, and together they can carry out protein synthesis. We have therefore determined that the correct answer is (A): substances pass between the inside of the nucleus and the surrounding cell cytoplasm through nuclear pores.

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