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Question Video: Identifying the Agglutination Patterns of Different Blood Types Biology

Blood samples can be tested for blood groups by agglutination. A small sample of blood is mixed with antibodies A and antibodies B. The table shows some results. What is the missing result?

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Video Transcript

Blood samples can be tested for blood groups by agglutination. A small sample of blood is mixed with antibodies A and antibodies B. The table provided shows some results. What is the missing result?

In humans, three alleles control the expression of blood group, or blood type: IA, IB, and IO. A person’s blood group indicates the type of antigens that are on the surface of their red blood cells. A person with blood type A has type A antigens on the surface of their red blood cells. A person with blood type B has type B antigens. A person with blood type AB has type A and type B antigens. And a person with blood type O has neither type A nor type B antigens on the surface of their red blood cells.

Antibodies target and bind to specific antigens. For instance, anti-A antibodies target and bind to type A antigens. When the antibodies bind to these antigens, they clump red blood cells together. This clumping of cells is referred to as agglutination. By using this pattern of agglutination, we can determine the blood type of a person by mixing a small sample of their blood with anti-A and anti-B antibodies.

The missing cell in the table is asking us to determine what happens when a sample of blood taken from a person with type B blood is mixed with anti-B antibodies. We know that anti-B antibodies will target type B antigens and cause agglutination. Therefore, the missing result is agglutination.

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