Video: Counting Groups of the Same Coin: GBP

In this video, we will learn how to count in 2s, 5s, and 10s within 100 to find the value of groups of the same type of coin.

17:42

Video Transcript

Counting Groups of the Same Coin: UK Pounds

In this video, we’re going to learn how to count in twos, fives, and 10s up to 100 to find the value of groups of the same type of coin. Do you remember the different coins that are used in the UK? Here they all are. Do you remember which one has the most value? It’s this two-pound coin here, then comes the one-pound coin, the 50-pence coin, and the 20-pence coin. But these are not the coins that we’re really going to be thinking about in this video, so we can get rid of them from the screen. This leaves us with four types of coins, and these are the ones that we’re going to be counting.

Now, do you remember what each one of these coins is worth? We’ve got the one-penny or one-pence coin. The second coin is worth two pence. Do you remember this small silver coin is worth five pence? And then we have the 10-pence coin. So all the coins that we’re going to be using in this video are going to be worth one, two, five, or 10 pence. Now, at the moment, we’ve only got one of each coin. But what happens if we have more than one of the same coin? What have we got here? Well, we could say that we’ve got five coins, one, two, three, four, five. So we’ve got five coins. But how much money do we have? What are those five coins worth?

Well, the first thing that we can say is that each of the coins is the same. And if we look really closely at the top of each coin, we can see two words that are going to help us here, two pence. We know by the color, the shape, the design on the coin, and even those two words that these are two-pence coins. Each one has a value of two pence. So to find out how much money we’ve got altogether, we need to count in twos, one number for each coin, two, four, six, eight, 10. The coins are worth 10 pence. So do you think that the five coins that we’ve just counted are worth exactly the same as one 10-pence coin? What do you think? Yes, they are. They both have a value of 10 pence. And because the line of our coins were all two-pence coins, it was good practice for counting in twos.

Now, let’s play a game. Here, we’ve got two strips of paper, and each one is covering something because underneath each strip of paper are some coins. Now, our game is this. You need to guess which group do you think is worth least. Now, perhaps you think, I can’t answer this. All I can see are two strips of paper. I need more information. So to help you with your guess, let’s give you some more information. Underneath the first strip of paper is a group of five coins, and you may’ve already noticed the second strip is a little bit shorter, isn’t it? That’s because the group of coins that’s underneath this strip is smaller. This is only three coins.

Now, which group do you think is worth least? Perhaps you’ve made your guess or, perhaps like this girl, you feel like you still need to know more. Why do you think this girl needs to know more information? We know that the first group has five coins in it, but the second group only has three. Surely the second group is worth least; there aren’t as many coins. Let’s pull away the pieces of paper and see what’s in each group. Here are the five coins that are in group one. Can you see how much each coin is worth? These are all one-penny coins. So to find the value of this group, we can count in ones. And counting in ones is just the same as counting, isn’t it? One, two, three, four, five. We have five coins, and altogether they’re worth five pence. Our first group is worth five pence.

Now, as we say, we know that in the second group, there are only three coins. So why does the girl in the picture still think she needs to know more information? Let’s see what the second group contains. Here are our three coins. But wait a moment. These aren’t one-penny coins. These are coins that have a different value. Do you remember what each of these coins is worth? These are five-pence coins. So if we’re going to count the value of these coins, we’re going to need to count in fives this time, one for each coin — five, 10, 15. This group of coins is worth 15 pence. Now we know that five pence is less than 15 pence. The group that’s worth the least is the first group. I wonder if that’s a surprise to some of you.

Looks like the girl was right when she said she needed to know more. If we have more coins, it doesn’t always mean we’ve got more money. Sometimes it does, but sometimes it doesn’t. It depends on what the coins are. Our first group looked quite big to start with, didn’t it? But because each coin was only worth one penny, it was worth less. And although our second group look quite small because each coin was worth five pence, the total amount was worth more. In other words, we can’t just count coins. We need to look at what they’re worth. And that’s why this video is all about counting in ones, twos, fives, and 10s.

Let’s try answering some questions now where we have to find the value of different groups of coins.

Look at the following line of 10-pence coins. How many coins are there? How much do the coins make altogether?

In the picture, we can see a line of coins. Now, we’re told in the question what each of these coins is worth, but can you tell by looking at the picture too? Each of the coins is a circle shape, and it’s silver. And as well as looking at the design on the coin, we can also see some words that we can use as a clue too. Can you read these small words at the top, 10 pence. Each coin is worth 10 pence. Perhaps you recognize them when you saw them. It’s a good skill to have. Now we’ve got two questions to answer about this line of coins. Firstly, how many coins are there? Because there are so few coins, perhaps you can see how many there are without counting each one. But maybe we’d better count just to make sure, one, two, three, four. There are four coins in the line, aren’t there?

Now, our next question is interesting. We’re asked how much do the coins make altogether. If somebody said, how much money have you got, what would we say? Do you think we just say I’ve got four coins or even I’ve got four 10-pence coins? We wouldn’t, would we? We’d say what the total amount is. And because each coin is worth 10 pence, we’re going to need to count in 10s to find out how much we’ve got. Let’s skip count in 10s, one number for each coin, 10, 20, 30, 40. These coins make a total of 40 pence. This is how much money we’d have if we had this row of coins.

To begin with, we knew that we had a line of 10-pence coins, and the first thing that we did was to count them. We found that there were four coins. And because each coin is worth 10 pence, we could skip count in 10s four times to find out how much all of the coins are worth. Altogether, the coins make 40 pence.

Look at the coins in the picture and find the value. There is what pence in total.

In the picture, we’re shown some coins, and can you see? They’re all the same type of coin. This makes it a lot easier to count how much they’re worth. And this is useful because this is exactly what we’ve got to do with this question. We need to find the value of these coins. What are they worth altogether? Or perhaps the very first thing we should do is what our question tells us to do. Look at the coins. What are these coins worth? Do you recognize them? They’re silver colored. They’re a circle shape. And if we look really closely, we might be able to make out two words that’re written across the center. Sometimes coins have their value written as a number, but on these coins, they’re written in words. Can you see what’s written on them? We can see the words five pence.

Each coin has a value of five pence, but that’s what one coin is worth, and we’ve got lots of coins here. So how can we find out what these coins are worth altogether? We’re going to need to count in fives, aren’t we, one lot of five for each of the coins we can see. Are you ready to skip count in fives? Five, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30. Because these are all five-pence coins, we could find how much they’re worth altogether by counting in fives. We ended on the number 30, and that’s how we know there is 30 pence in total. The missing number is 30.

We have two groups of coins as shown in the picture, two-pence coins and 10-pence coins. Which group has more coins? Which group has more money?

We’re told that we have two groups of coins. Let’s spend a moment to look at them. The first group is labeled two-pence coins. Do you know why this is? Well, each of the coins in this group is the same, and they’re all worth two pence. Perhaps you remember that by the way that these coins look or by the way that it says at the top of each coin two pence. Now, our second group is a little bit shorter, isn’t it? There are less coins in this group, and this group is labeled 10-pence coins. Each of the coins in this group is worth 10 pence. And again, perhaps you knew this already. They’re silver colored, they’re circular, and if you look really closely, you’ll be able to make out the words 10 pence at the top of each coin.

So we’ve been given these two groups of coins to look at. Let’s take a look at the questions that we need to answer. But perhaps you notice when we very first read these questions, they do sound quite similar. Which group has more coins? Which group has more money? That’s the same thing, isn’t it? Let’s begin with the first question, which group has more coins? Now, when we ask this, what we’re talking about is how many bits of metal are there in this group. How many actual coins are there? We’re not worried about what each one is worth, what their value is. We’re just worried about how many there are. And as we’ve said already, the line of 10-pence coins looks a little bit shorter, doesn’t it, than the line of two-pence coins. Perhaps, we’d better count each group just to be safe.

In the group of two-pence coins, we can see one, two, three, four, five, six coins altogether. And in the group of 10-pence coins, there are one, two, three, four coins altogether. It’s just like we thought. The group that has more coins is the group of two-pence coins, isn’t it? In the second question, we’re asked which group has more money? You might think to yourself, well, we’ve just seen which group has more coins, and that’s the group of two-pence coins. So surely this group has more money. More coins means more money, doesn’t it? Well, it doesn’t because what this question is asking us is which group is worth the most, and this depends on what sort of coins we’re looking at. In the first group, all of the coins are worth two pence each, so we can skip count in twos to find the total, two, four, six, eight, 10, 12. The two-pence coins altogether are worth 12 pence.

Now, if we stop and think about this, we can probably answer the question now. We know that each of the coins in the second group are worth 10 pence, and we have four coins in the second group, four lots of 10 pence. All those two-pence coins in the first group only added up to 12 pence. Do you think the second group is going to add up to more than 12 pence? I think so, don’t you, especially as each coin is worth 10 pence already. But there’s only one way to find out, and that’s to skip count in 10s, 10, 20.

Well, we’re already more than 12, aren’t way? So we know that this group has more money. Let’s carry on counting from 20, 30, 40. Our 10-pence coins are worth 40 pence altogether. This question has taught us something interesting about coins. Just because we have more coins doesn’t always mean that we have more money. It depends on what our coins are worth. The group that had more coins in our question was the group of two-pence coins. But when we counted the value of each group, we found that the group that had more money was the group of 10-pence coins.

Now, earlier on in the video, we played a quick game. So just before we finish, let’s play another one. Here are five groups of coins, and your job is to spot the odd one out. Now with odd one out questions, sometimes it’s quite difficult because there could be lots of answers. For example, you might say this was the odd one out because it’s the only one that isn’t a circle. Or you might choose a different reason. You might say this one is the odd one out because it’s only in a group of one, whereas all the others have lots of coins in them, so we’ll give you a quick clue. The answer is got something to do with how much each group is worth. Perhaps we’d better look at each group and find out. Let’s start with this coin first, being there’s only one of them. Do you remember what this silver coin is worth? It’s not big enough to be a 50-pence piece, is it? It’s a 20-pence coin.

Now let’s think about this group here. We recognize these, don’t we? These are five-pence coins. So to find the value of this group, we’re going to need to skip count in fives, five, 10, 15, 20. This group is worth 20 pence too. Let’s have a look at this large group here. Each coin in this group is worth two pence, isn’t it? Let’s count in twos to find out how much the whole group is worth, two, four, six, eight, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20. Think we’re learning something about money here, aren’t we? It’s possible for people to have the same amount of money, but made with different coins. So far, we’ve made 20 pence in three different ways.

Think maybe the answer to this question is going to be a group that doesn’t have a value of 20 pence, don’t you? This group at the bottom is quite quick to count, isn’t it, because we can see that it has two coins and each coin is worth 10 pence, 10, 20. Another group of coins that’s worth 20 pence. It looks like this group of one-penny coins might be our odd one out. And because each coin is worth one penny, we need to count in ones, one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, getting close to 20, 20. But we’ve got one more coin, 21. And so if we’re talking about the value of each group, the odd one out is this group here. All of the other groups are worth 20 pence.

What did we learn in this video? We’ve learned how to count in twos, fives, and 10s to find the value of groups of the same type of coin.

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