Video: Refraction Angle of a Light Ray

A pencil flashlight submerged in water sends a light beam toward the surface at an angle of incidence of 30Β° from the air-water boundary. Find the angle of refraction in air. Use a value of 1.33 for the refractive index of water.

02:42

Video Transcript

A pencil flashlight submerged in water sends a light beam toward the surface at an angle of incidence of 30 degrees from the air-water boundary. Find the angle of refraction in air. Use a value of 1.33 for the refractive index of water.

We’re told in the statement that the angle of incidence of the light beam on the air-water boundary is 30 degrees; we’ll call that πœƒ sub 𝑖. We’re also told that the index of refraction of water is 1.33, which we’ll call 𝑛 sub 𝑀.

We want to solve for the angle of refraction in air, which we’ll call πœƒ sub π‘Ÿ. To get started on our solution, let’s draw a diagram of this situation. In this scenario, an underwater flashlight shines light up to an air-water interface.

The ray of light is refracted or bent at the interface, and we want to find out how much; that is, what πœƒ sub π‘Ÿ? In this example, we’ll assume that the index of refraction of air, 𝑛 sub π‘Ž, is exactly 1.00. To solve for πœƒ sub π‘Ÿ, let’s recall Snell’s law which says that if a ray of light travels from one material with index of refraction 𝑛 one into another material with index of refraction 𝑛 two, then 𝑛 one times the sine of the incident angle equals 𝑛 two times the sine of the refracted angle, where those angles are measured with respect to a line perpendicular to the interface.

Applying this relationship to our scenario, we see that the index of refraction of water times the sine of the incident angle πœƒ sub 𝑖 equals the index of refraction of air times the sine of the refracted angle πœƒ sub π‘Ÿ. If we divide both sides of the equation by 𝑛 sub π‘Ž and take the inverse sine of both sides, we find that πœƒ sub π‘Ÿ equals the arc sine of 𝑛 sub 𝑀 over 𝑛 sub π‘Ž times the sine of the incident angle πœƒ sub 𝑖.

Plugging in for 𝑛 sub 𝑀, 𝑛 sub π‘Ž, and πœƒ sub 𝑖, when we enter this value on our calculator, we find that πœƒ sub π‘Ÿ to two significant figures is 42 degrees. That’s the refracted angle of light crossing this air-water interface.

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