Question Video: Determining the Charge Flowing past a Point in a Circuit | Nagwa Question Video: Determining the Charge Flowing past a Point in a Circuit | Nagwa

Question Video: Determining the Charge Flowing past a Point in a Circuit Science • Third Year of Preparatory School

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The diagram shows an electric circuit containing a cell and a bulb. The current in the circuit is 2 amperes. How much charge flows past point ๐‘ƒ in the circuit in 1 second?

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Video Transcript

The diagram shows an electric circuit containing a cell and a bulb. The current in the circuit is two amperes. How much charge flows past point ๐‘ƒ in the circuit in one second? The current in the circuit is two amperes. How much charge flows past point ๐‘ƒ in the circuit in one second?

The diagram shows the cell, the bulb, and also the wires connecting these two components. The point ๐‘ƒ is over here, and the arrow shows us the direction of the current. And we are told that the value of this current is two amperes. Recall that the unit symbol for the ampere is the uppercase letter A. Now, the question asks us to determine how much charge flows past point ๐‘ƒ in the circuit in one second if the current in the circuit is two amperes. To do this, weโ€™ll need to recall how current is related to charge and time. One ampere, the unit for current, is defined as one coulomb of charge moving past a point in one second.

In our question, weโ€™re also interested in a time of one second. But instead of a current of a single ampere, we have a current of two amperes. Luckily, the conversion is easy. If one ampere is one coulomb per second, then two amperes is two coulombs per second. And this is our answer. Two amperes is two coulombs of charge passing a point every one second. So the answer is two coulombs.

We should pay careful attention to the two statements weโ€™ve written down. On the left, we defined one ampere with a time of one second and two amperes also with a time of one second. This is because current is always defined by how much charge moves past a point in exactly one second. So as the current changes, the amount of charge changes, but not the amount of time it takes that charge to move.

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