Question Video: Identifying the Name of an Illustrated Apparatus | Nagwa Question Video: Identifying the Name of an Illustrated Apparatus | Nagwa

Question Video: Identifying the Name of an Illustrated Apparatus Chemistry • First Year of Secondary School

What apparatus is shown in the illustration?

04:28

Video Transcript

What apparatus is shown in the illustration? (A) A gas syringe apparatus for measuring the volume of the gas produced. (B) A titration experiment for measuring the concentration of the hydrochloric acid. (C) A graduated cylinder for measuring the volume of the liquid in the beaker. (D) A graduated cylinder for measuring the volume of the gas in the rubber tubing. Or (E) a water displacement apparatus for measuring the volume of the gas produced.

Let’s have a look at the devices described in our answer choices to compare them to the apparatus given in the illustration. Gas syringes, as the name suggests, are used to measure the volume of gases. A gas syringe can be connected using rubber tubing to an Erlenmeyer flask where gas is being produced, likely from a reaction. As the gas is produced and enters the syringe, it will push the plunger back and the volume of the gas collected can then be read from the gradations on the syringe. We can see that a gas syringe is not present in the illustration, so we can eliminate answer choice (A).

In a titration experiment, generally, a buret is clamped upright using a stand over a vessel, such as an Erlenmeyer flask. Burets are extremely precise pieces of glassware with many gradations along their long, thin cylindrical shape and a stopcock to control the flow of liquid out of the buret. We can see that the illustration given does not match the setup of a titration experiment. We can eliminate answer choice (B).

Both answer choices (C) and (D) mention a graduated cylinder, which can also be called a measuring cylinder. Graduated cylinders are used very commonly in chemistry as they can be used to measure the volume of substances using the gradations along their long, cylindrical shape. Graduated cylinders come in many different sizes, and the most common use is to measure the volume of a liquid. However, we can see from the illustration that the liquid in the beaker is not being poured into the graduated cylinder to measure its volume, so we can eliminate answer choice (C).

Another way a graduated cylinder can be used is by filling it with water and inverting it into another vessel with water, such as a beaker. Now filled with water, this setup can utilize the gradations of the graduated cylinder to measure the volume of another substance. For example, if a gas is being produced and its volume needs to be measured, water displacement in the graduated cylinder can be used. The vessel in which the gas is being produced can be sealed off with the exception of some type of tubing that can be placed under the opening of the graduated cylinder.

As the gas is produced and flows through the tubing, it can bubble up through the water in the cylinder and displace the water back down into the water bath, as long as the opening of the cylinder is kept below the surface of the water. Then, the volume of the gas produced can be read from the gradations of the cylinder. This setup is called a water displacement apparatus, and we can see that it does match the illustration shown. And it is being used to measure the volume of hydrogen gas produced from the reaction between the zinc plate and the hydrochloric acid.

Additionally, the graduated cylinder in this apparatus is not being used simply to measure the gas in the rubber tubing. The gas produced in the reaction moves through the tubing to reach the graduated cylinder. So we can eliminate answer choice (D). Therefore, the apparatus that is shown in the illustration is answer choice (E): a water displacement apparatus for measuring the volume of the gas produced.

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