Video: Converting between Millilitres and litres

The given table shows the number of soda bottles sold in Mr Adam’s shop yesterday. Did he sell more than 100000 millilitres?

04:53

Video Transcript

The given table shows the number of soda bottles sold in Mr. Adam’s shop yesterday. Did he sell more than 100000 millilitres?

Our table contains two rows. In the first row, we can see two types of bottle, one-litre bottles and also two-litre bottles. We know that the bottles being described are soda bottles that are being sold in Mr. Adam’s shop. And so the second row shows us the number of each type of bottle that was sold in the shop yesterday. We can see that he sold 15 one-litre bottles of soda and 37 two-litre bottles of soda. And the question asked us whether Mr. Adam sold more than 100000 millilitres. At the moment, the capacity of each type of bottle is in litres. So we need to calculate the amount of soda that Mr. Adam sold in millilitres. We need to convert these litres into millilitres.

To do this, we need to remind ourselves about a fact. One litre is equal to 1000 millilitres. And so we can start by writing the capacity of each type of bottle in millilitres. Our one-litre bottle can be written as 1000 millilitres. And the two-litre bottles contain twice as much. They contain 2000 millilitres. Now, if we look at the first column of numbers, we can see that Mr. Adam sold 15 one-litre bottles. We now know this is the same as 15 lots of 1000 millilitres. So we can write this as a multiplication, 15 times 1000. 15 lots of 1000 is 15000. So the number of millilitres that we can see in the first column is 15000 millilitres.

In the same way, we can use multiplication to calculate the number of millilitres in the second column. Here we have 37 bottles. And each bottle contains 2000 millilitres. So the multiplication we need to work out is 37 times 2000. Now we know that 2000 is the same as two times 1000. So we can make the calculation easier by multiplying 37 by two and then by 1000. First of all, let’s work out 37 times two. We know seven times two equals 14. And 30 times two equals 60. And so to find 37 times two, we just need to add 60 and 14 together. 37 times two then is 74. And we now need to multiply this by 1000. 74 lots of 1000 equal 74000.

So the number of millilitres that we can see in the second column is 74000. And the question asks did Mr. Adam sell more than 100000 millilitres. We know we can see 15000 millilitres that he sold in the first column and 74000 millilitres in the second column. So what we’re really asking ourselves is if we add these two amounts together, is it going to make more than 100000 millilitres. Well, we will add them together in a moment. But you should be able to see just by looking at these numbers whether it makes more than 100000 or not. For example, we know what goes with 15 to make 100. And we know that that number is more than 74.

Anyway, let’s check our answer. We can see straightaway that the ones, the tens, and the hundreds all have nothing in them. So we can just write zeros there. 5000 plus 4000 equals 9000. And 10000 plus 70000 equals 80000. That’s a total of 89000 millilitres that Mr. Adam sold. 89000 is less than 100000. So did Mr. Adam sell more than 100000 millilitres? The answer’s no.

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