Lesson Video: Reading and Writing 13, 14, and 15 Mathematics • Kindergarten

In this video, we will learn how to read, write, and model the numbers 13, 14, and 15.

11:10

Video Transcript

Reading and Writing 13, 14, and 15

In this video, we’re going to learn how to read, write, and also model the numbers 13, 14, and 15. Have you ever heard of the word teenager? Maybe you have a brother or a sister who’s a teenager. This is a word that we use to describe someone who’s gone from being 12 years old to an age that ends in teen. It’s a big thing, and it feels special to go from 12 to 13 and beyond. Well, in this video, we’re going into our teens too. We know how to count up to 12. But we’re going to carry on counting into some teen numbers.

First of all, let’s practice saying the numbers up to 10. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10. And we also know some numbers after 10, don’t we? 11 is one more than 10 and then comes 12 which is two more than 10. And after 12, we go into the teens: 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15. There are a few more teen numbers, but 13, 14, and 15 are the three that we’re going to be thinking about in this video. Look at the ending of each word. Can you see the teen part? 13, 14, and 15.

Now, we know the number 13 is one, two, three more than 10. And you know the first part of the number 13, the thir- part, looks a little bit like the number three, doesn’t it? We could use this to help us remember 13 is three more than 10, so we can model the number 13 by showing 10 and then three more. Let’s use some blocks. Here’s a group of 10, 11, 12, 13. So we can model the number 13 by showing three more than 10. Now the number 14 is four more than 10.

And again, if we look at the start of the word 14, we can see a clue that can help us. Let’s model 14 using a 10 frame. We know whenever we see a full 10 frame, this is 10, so we just need four more. 10, 11, 12, 13, 14. We’ve modeled the number 14 by showing four more than 10. And finally, 15 is five more than 10. The fif- part of 15 reminds us of this, doesn’t it? How could we model 15? Should we use an abacus? First, we can show 10 and then five more. 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15. 15 is five more than 10.

So now we know where these numbers belong, we know how to read and write them in words, and we know how to model them using maths equipment. But how do we write them using digits? These three teen numbers are all two-digit numbers. They all have a one followed by another digit. We write the number 13 using the digits one and then three. So it’s straight down for a one, and then we draw a curve down into the middle and then down again and back up slightly for the digit three.

As you’ve probably guessed, the number 14 is written using the digits one and then four. So again, that’s straight down for the digit one. And then we draw a line coming down and then straight across. And then we lift our pencil off the page and draw a line straight down to write the digit four. And then 15 is a one and a five. One, straight across, straight down, and a curve all the way around to write the digit five. 13, 14, 15. Let’s try answering some questions now where we have to read, write, and also model these three teen numbers.

Which group shows 14 blocks?

In this question, we’re shown four groups of blocks. Now it doesn’t matter what color they are; they’re all different colors, aren’t they? And it doesn’t matter how the blocks are arranged. They’re all in different positions, aren’t they? The only thing that matters is how many blocks are in each group. And we’re given a number to look for. Can you see the number in the question? A one followed by a four. How do we read this number? This number has the name 14. And 14 is four more than 10.

Let’s count the blocks in each group to see which one has four more than 10 in it. Let’s cross through each block so that we know we’ve counted it. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine. Well, now that we’ve got to 10, we can see that this group doesn’t show four more than 10. It shows three more than 10. 10, 11, 12, 13. Our first group shows 13. Let’s try the second group. One, two, three, four, five six, seven, eight, nine, 10. This group is too small.

In the next group, we can count one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine. Here are our 10, and we can see that there are four more blocks we haven’t counted yet. 10, 11, 12, 13, 14. This group shows four more than 10, which is the same as 14. And if we count the last group, we can see that there are only eight blocks. The group that shows 14 blocks is this one; it’s the one where we counted four more than 10.

Which number shows how many bikes there are?

In the picture, we can see a group of bikes. And we need to count them to find out how many there are. Now we could just count the bikes individually: one, two, three, and so on. But there’s a quicker way we could find the answer by looking at how the bikes have been grouped together. We can see that there are five bikes in the top row, and there are the same number of bikes in the row underneath, too. And we know that five plus another five makes 10, so we can see straightaway that there are 10 bikes in this part of the group. But we’ve got to count one, two, three more than 10. What number is three more than 10? 10, 11, 12, 13.

To help us count the number of bikes, we spotted that there was a group of 10 and then three more. And we know that three more than 10 is 13. We write the number 13 using digits by writing a one followed by a three. The number that shows how many bikes there are is 13.

Which of the following models represents 15?

In this question, we’re shown four different models made out of 10 frames. And we’re asked which of the models represents this number here. It’s a one followed by a five. Do you remember how we say this number? It’s the number 15, isn’t it? We know the number 15 is five more than 10. We know we can use this fact to help us spot where the number 15 is.

Now each of our models has got something in common. Can you see it? They’re all made up of one full 10 frame and then some more counters. So each number is more than 10. Now remember, if we’re looking for the number 15, we’re looking for a 10 frame and then five more, aren’t we? Can you spot which model this is? It’s the bottom one, isn’t it? Let’s count down from 10 to check. 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15.

Our first model shows four more than 10. This is 14. The second model shows three more than 10, which is the same as 13. Our third model shows two more than 10, which equals 12. But our last model shows five more than 10. And so we know that this is the model that represents the number 15.

What have we learned in this video? We have learned how to read, write, and model the numbers 13, 14, and 15.

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