Question Video: Determining Which Molecule Would Not Form a Coordinate Covalent Bond with a Metal Ion | Nagwa Question Video: Determining Which Molecule Would Not Form a Coordinate Covalent Bond with a Metal Ion | Nagwa

Question Video: Determining Which Molecule Would Not Form a Coordinate Covalent Bond with a Metal Ion Chemistry • Second Year of Secondary School

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Which of the following molecules would you predict is unlikely to form a coordinate covalent bond with a metal ion in solution? Assume no bonds on the molecule are broken. [A] CH₄ [B] H₂O [C] CO [D] Br⁻ [E] NH³

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Video Transcript

Which of the following molecules would you predict is unlikely to form a coordinate covalent bond with a metal ion in solution? Assume no bonds on the molecule are broken. (A) CH4, (B) H2O, (C) CO, (D) Br1-, or (E) NH3.

Coordinate covalent bonds are unusual types of covalent bonds. All of the bonding electrons are from one atom rather than both as we see in a conventional covalent bond. The coordinate covalent bond forms when one atom effectively donates a lone pair of electrons to the other atom.

A common example of this is when water molecules form coordinate covalent bonds with metal ions in a solution. Water molecules can form coordinate covalent bonds with a metal ion because the oxygen in water has lone pairs of electrons. Lone pairs from the oxygen atoms in water can be donated to the metal ion to form a complex. Often, metal ions can form many coordinate covalent bonds by accepting multiple lone pairs of electrons. A coordinate covalent bond can be represented as an arrow, with the species shown at the arrowhead representing the electron pair acceptor and the species at the base representing an electron pair donor.

Let’s have a look at the Lewis structures for our answer choices to determine which species does not have lone pairs of electrons. Species that do not have lone pairs of electrons are unlikely to form a coordinate covalent bond with a metal ion. We can thus identify which species cannot be an electron pair donor to find the correct answer to this question.

We can draw the Lewis structures of answer choices (A) through (E). We can see that of the answer choices, the only structure that does not have lone pairs would be answer choice (A), or methane. Methane would be unlikely to form a coordinate covalent bond with a metal ion in solution due to its lack of lone pairs of electrons. Therefore, the correct answer is answer choice (A), CH4.

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