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Video: Determining the Experimental Probability of an Event

Kathryn Kingham

Two coins are tossed 76 times. The upper faces are observed, and the results are recorded in this table. Determine the experimental probability of getting two tails as a fraction in its simplest form.

02:29

Video Transcript

Two coins are tossed 76 times. The upper faces are observed and the results are recorded in this table. Determine the experimental probability of getting two tails as a fraction in its simplest form. Experimental probability is based on what actually happened after you’ve performed an experiment. In this case, two coins that are tossed 76 times are the experiment. We want to know what the probability is of getting two tails.

The probability of two tails equals the number of favorable outcomes over the total outcomes. Our favorable outcomes are the times when two tails facing up are recorded. 16 of occurrences yielded two tails facing up. And how many total outcomes were possible? The coins were tossed 76 times, which means there was 76 different outcomes possible.

The experimental probability is 16 over 76, but we can’t overlook the instruction that we were given. Our question has asked us to present this probability in simplest form. This means we have some reducing to do.

I noticed that both 16 and 76 are even numbers, which means they’re both divisible by two. 16 divided by two is eight. 76 divided by two is 38. Eight and 38 are both even numbers again, so we know that we can divide the numerator and the denominator by two again. If we divide eight by two and 38 by two, equals four-nineteenths. Four-nineteenths cannot be reduced any further. It’s in its simplest form. The probability of observing two tails is four-nineteenths.