Lesson Video: Comparing Groups of Objects: More Than | Nagwa Lesson Video: Comparing Groups of Objects: More Than | Nagwa

Lesson Video: Comparing Groups of Objects: More Than Mathematics • Kindergarten

In this video, we will learn how to compare two groups of up to 5 objects to see which has more objects using a matching strategy.

10:11

Video Transcript

Comparing Groups of Objects: More Than

In this video, we’re going to learn how to compare two groups of up to five objects to see which has more objects. And the way we’re going to do this is using a matching strategy. In this picture, we can see some monsters. We have a group of orange monsters and a group of one-eyed green monsters. But which type of monster is there more of, the orange monsters or the green monsters?

To find the answer, we need to compare the groups. And we’re going to be using words like “more” as we go through this video. Two more useful words are “greater” — we could say that a group is greater than another group — and another useful word we’ll be using is “larger.” All these words mean roughly the same thing. So how can we find out which group of monsters is greater or larger?

Well, we can see in the picture that the monsters in each line are equally spaced. This means that we can match them up, one orange monster with one green monster, and so on. Let’s count aloud as we do this. One, two, three, four. So we can definitely match up four pairs of monsters. But we’ve got some green monsters left over. There aren’t enough orange monsters to match with them. So what does this tell us about the groups? We can say there are more green monsters than orange monsters. The group of green monsters is larger.

In this picture, we’ve got two more groups of monsters. There are some pink monsters and a group of blue monsters. But let’s compare the size of each group. Are there more pink monsters or more blue monsters? Well, we can see unfortunately this time the monsters are not arranged neatly in two lines. Now they do look friendly, so we could politely ask them to line up and space themselves out equally. But is there another way to find the answer by using matching?

Well, when we have a picture of objects like this and we can’t move them, we can use maths equipment to help. To start with, let’s put a pink counter next to each of the pink monsters, one counter for one monster. There we go. Now we can move our counters and make a line of them. Let’s count as we do so. There are one, two, three, four pink counters. And that makes four pink monsters.

Let’s do the same with the group of blue monsters, one blue counter for each monster. Now let’s make a line of them. And we’ll match them up to our pink counters, one at a time. One, two, three, four. Now we’ve matched up all the pink counters with blue counters, but we’ve still got another blue counter to go, five.

Now if we compare our two lines of counters, we can see that our line of blue counters is longer than our line of pink counters. This tells us that there are more blue monsters than pink monsters. There’s a greater number of blue monsters. It’s a larger group.

Now let’s use this matching strategy and some of these words as we compare some other groups of objects.

Are there more drumsticks than drums?

In the picture, we can see a row of drumsticks. And above them, there’s a row of drums. Our question asks us to compare these two groups of objects. Are there more drumsticks than drums? We can see that the way that the objects have been spaced out, we can match each drumstick with a drum. One, two, three. But we can’t match up our final drumstick. There aren’t enough drums. This drumstick is left over after we’ve matched the drumsticks with the drums. And so we can say that there are more drumsticks than drums. The answer to our question is yes.

Are there more balls or more rackets?

In the picture, we can see a row of tennis balls. And above them is a row of tennis rackets. The question is asking us to compare these two groups of objects together. Which is greater? Are there more balls or are there more rackets? Sometimes when objects have been arranged in a line, we can compare the lines and see which is longer. If we do this, we can see that the line of tennis rackets is longer than the line of balls. Does this mean there are more rackets?

Well, no it doesn’t because a tennis racket is longer than a tennis ball. And the way our lines of objects have been made are not equally spaced. But you know we can still compare the groups by matching each ball with a racket. One, two, three. But we don’t have a racket to match the last ball to. This means there must be more balls than rackets. The group of balls is larger than the group of rackets. So are there more balls or more rackets? There are more balls.

Jennifer has two bags of marbles. Which bag has more marbles than the other?

In the picture, we can see the two bags of marbles that Jennifer has. They’re labeled bag A and bag B. We need to compare bag A with bag B because we’re asked which bag has more marbles than the other. Which bag contains a larger group of marbles?

Now the way these marbles have been drawn, it could be quite difficult to match them up. Let’s use counters to help us. First, we’ll count the marbles in bag A. And we’re going to use one counter for each marble that we count. One, two, three, four, five. There are five marbles in bag A. What about bag B? There are one, two, three marbles in bag B.

Now we can compare the two heights of the towers of counters that we’ve made. Tower A is taller than tower B. So we know there must be more counters in it. And we also know there must be more marbles in bag A than bag B. And so, out of Jennifer’s two bags of marbles, the bag that has more marbles than the other is bag A.

Complete the following. There are more what than dogs?

We’re shown a picture that shows three groups of animals, all jumbled up. There’s a group of cats, a group of dogs, and a group of ducks. And the question asks us to compare these groups together. We need to complete the sentence. There are more what than dogs? So to find the answer, we need to compare the number of cats with dogs and also the number of ducks with dogs.

One of these groups of animals will be larger than the group of dogs. But which one? Now this is a picture of cats and dogs and ducks, and we can’t move them and put them in a line to compare them or match them up. But what we could do is use maths equipment to help us.

First of all, let’s model the number of dogs that there are by using cubes. We can start off by putting a cube next to each dog, one cube for one dog. Now let’s put all our cubes together, and we’ll count them as we do this. One, two, three. There are three dogs. Now let’s compare the ducks with the dogs. Are there more ducks than dogs? First, we can match one cube with one duck. Now let’s count them. One, two. There are two ducks in the picture.

Now if we compare our two lines of cubes, we can see that there are more dogs than ducks. So can we say that there are more ducks than dogs? No we can’t. Let’s try the cats, a cube for each cat to help us model how many there are. Now let’s count them. One, two, three, four. There are four cats.

Let’s compare then the number of cats to dogs. Can we say that there are more cats than dogs? Yes, we can. We can see that the line of cubes that we’ve made is longer for cats than it is for dogs. And we can also see this in the picture. If we match up one cat with one dog, we’ve got an extra cat left over. There are more cats than dogs.

So what have we learned in this video? Firstly, we’ve learned to compare groups of objects together. And the way that we’ve done this is by using matching strategies. We’ve matched the objects up to see whether we have any left over. And secondly, we’ve used words like “more,” “larger,” and “greater” to say which group has more objects.

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