Question Video: Identifying the Different Methods of Asexual Reproduction | Nagwa Question Video: Identifying the Different Methods of Asexual Reproduction | Nagwa

Question Video: Identifying the Different Methods of Asexual Reproduction Science • Third Year of Preparatory School

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The table below outlines some asexual reproductive methods and the organisms that use them. What should replace X?

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Video Transcript

The table below outlines some asexual reproductive methods and the organisms that use them. What should replace X?

To determine what should replace X in the table, let’s first take a look at the information that’s already filled in. The first column gives us the organism, the second, the method of asexual reproduction, and the third column provides a brief description of that method. In the first row, we can see that Salmonella bacteria use the method of binary fission. This is when the parent cell copies or doubles its genetic material before splitting into two separate daughter cells. In the second row, we can see that yeast use budding for asexual reproduction. In this method, the parent cell forms a growth, or bud, that develops into a small individual and eventually detaches.

In the third row, we’re told that flatworms reproduce asexually when the parent splits into two parts and each of these parts grows into a new organism. The question asks us to replace X with the correct term for this method of asexual reproduction. The description of method X is similar to the description of binary fission and that both involve the parent organism splitting into two parts. However, in binary fission, these two parts become two separate cells, while in method X, each of the new parts eventually become new multicellular organisms. This is an important distinction because binary fission is only used by single-celled organisms, and flatworms are multicellular.

Many multicellular organisms, including flatworms, use a method of asexual reproduction called regeneration. Let’s take a look at the process of regeneration in a type of flatworm called a Planaria. If the Planaria is split into two parts or fragments, each fragment will regrow or regenerate the parts of the body it is missing, shown in the shaded pink regions of the diagram. The end result is two fully functioning offspring. The process of regeneration matches the description of method X given in the table. So we can say that the correct term to replace X in the table is regeneration.

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