Video: Reading and Writing 16 and 17

In this video, we will learn how to read, write, and model the numbers 16 and 17.

14:52

Video Transcript

Reading and Writing 16 and 17

In this video, we’re going to learn how to read, write, and model the numbers 16 and 17. Are you ready to learn some new numbers? Well, whenever we do learn a new number, it’s often a good idea to practice all the ones we already know. Then we can see where our new number belongs, how it fits in with all the others. Let’s start by saying all the numbers up to 10. We know these, don’t we? one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10.

But we also know some numbers after 10, don’t we? One more than 10 is 11. Two more than 10 is 12. And then after 12, we know some teen numbers, don’t we? 13, 14, and 15. And we’ll stop there because this video is about the two numbers that come after 15. We can count to 15, but what comes next? The numbers we write next are sixteen and then seventeen. These are the numbers we’re going to be learning about in this video. Look at how we write both these numbers as words. Can you see that both words have a teen part on the end? They’re what we call teen numbers, just like 13, 14, and 15.

And what can you see at the start of each word? There’s the number six in sixteen and the number seven in seventeen. And you know the numbers six and seven can really help us understand more about sixteen and seventeen. Sixteen is six more than 10. So we could model it by showing 10 ones and then another six ones. We could use a bead string. So let’s start by saying 10 and then count on another six. 10 and then 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16. 16 is 10 and then another six. And look how we write the number 16 as a number. It’s got two parts to it, doesn’t it? There’s the number one followed by a six. And so if we write a one and then a six after it, we’ve written the number 16. Let’s write the number 16 on our row of numbers at the top. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16.

Now let’s learn about the number seventeen. Do you think this has got something to do with the number seven at all? Yes, it does, because while sixteen is six more than 10, seventeen is seven more than 10. This means we could model it by showing 10 ones and then another seven ones. We used a bead string last time. Let’s use something different. Let’s use these ten frames and some counters. And because we know seventeen is seven more than 10, we’re going to need 10 counters to begin with. There we are. A full ten frame is worth 10, and here are seven more counters to count on. So we’ll start by saying 10 and then 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17. 17 is 10 and then another seven. And did you notice how we write 17 as a number? We start with a one again, but the number 17 has a seven after it. So if we begin with a one and then write a seven, we’ve written the number 17.

Now that we can write 17 as a number, should we add it to our numbers at the top? One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17. Now that we can read, write, and model these two new numbers, it’s time to practice what we’ve learned. Let’s try answering some questions that all to do with these numbers, 16 and 17.

Count the hats. Write a number to show how many there are.

In the picture, we can see some hats that we’ve got to count, and we need to write our answer as a number to show how many there are. Before we start, can you see anything interesting about the way that these hats have been arranged? Just like we often put counters into ten frames to help us count and learn about numbers, we can see that these hats have been put in ten frames too. Perhaps we can use this to help us count them. What do you notice about the first ten frame? It’s full, isn’t it? There are no gaps. How many hats do you think make up a full ten frame? There must be 10 hats. That’s why we call this a ten frame.

So in the picture, we can see 10 hats and then some more hats. How many more? One, two, three, four, five, six more. The number of hats is six more than 10. What number is six more than 10? It’s time to count the hats. One, two, three — wait a moment. We don’t have to start counting at one, do we? We already know there are 10 hats in this first ten frame. So why don’t we point to the first ten frame and say 10 and then start counting from 10. 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16. We’ve counted 16 hats altogether. We can see that there are six more than 10. And six more than 10 is 16.

Now, we know we write the number 16 using words as the number six followed by teen, sixteen. But our question asked us to write the answer as a number. Do you remember how to write sixteen as a number? Well, first, we need to write the number one and then the number six. A one followed by a six is 16. We counted the hats and then we wrote a number to show how many there are. There are 16 hats.

Are there 17 balloons?

In the picture, we can see some red balloons, and our question asks about them. Did you notice there was a number in our question? We write this number as a one followed by a seven. And do you remember how to say this number? You may have heard it said in the question, if you’re listening carefully. It’s the number 17. And our question asks us, is this how many balloons there are? Are there 17 balloons? The answer to this question is either going to be yes or no. And there’s only one way to find out. We need to count them. Now what do you notice about the way these balloons have been shown? They’re inside two ten frames, aren’t they?

And if we look carefully at the first ten frame, we can see that it’s completely full. There are no gaps in our first ten frame. This means it looks like there are 10 balloons in there. Should we count them? One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10. We were right. A full ten frame means 10 balloons. Now how many more than 10 can we see? In the second ten frame, there are another one, two, three, four, five, six balloons. This is interesting because we’re looking for 17 altogether, aren’t we? And one thing we know about the number 17 is that it’s seven more than 10. But we’ve just counted six more balloons than 10. It looks like we might not have 17 balloons. So far, we’ve got as far as 10.

So let’s say 10 and then carry on counting for our six more balloons and see how far we get. So we’ll start with 10 and then 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16. Six more than 10 is 16 not 17. So when we’re asked, are there 17 balloons, we can say, no.

Count the flowers aloud and then write the number.

The picture shows us some flowers. And in this question, we need to find out how many there are because we’re told to count the flowers aloud. In other words, instead of trying to count in our heads, we need to say each number. Now some of these flowers look the same. Can you think of a way to make sure that we count all of the flowers but we don’t count any of them more than once? What if every time we count a flower, we put a colored counter on top of it? Let’s start at the top and work our way across. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10. This is interesting. There are more than 10 flowers. Did you think they were going to be more than 10 when we started? Let’s carry on counting from 10. 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16.

We’ve covered up all the flowers with counters. And we counted up to 16. Now we just need to write the number. Do you remember how to write 16? Well, it’s got a six in it, but this isn’t the first number that we write. We write a one and then a six, 16. We’ve counted the flowers out loud to see how many there were. The number of flowers that there are is 16.

Which number is shown by the model? 15, 16, or 17.

In the picture, we can see a model. In maths, when we talk about models, we just mean a way of showing a number. And this way of showing a number involves two ten frames and some counters. But what number does this model show? Underneath, we’ve got three numbers to choose from. Can you read them? 15, 16, and 17. These are all teen numbers, aren’t they? And we get to each of these numbers by counting to 10 and then counting some more. We know that the number 15 is five more than 10. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15. And if 15 is five more than 10, 16 must be six more than 10 and 17 must be seven more than 10.

Perhaps we could use what we know about these numbers to help us answer the question. Let’s get back to our ten frame and counters. What do you notice about them? Well, if we look at our first ten frame to begin with, we can see there’s no space left on it. It’s a full ten frame. Do you remember how many counters a ten frame holds? I’ll give you a clue; it’s not called an eight frame or a nine frame, is it? We call it a 10 frame because it holds 10. Our full ten frame shows the number 10.

But we can see some more counters in the second ten frame. How many more than 10 are there? We can see another one, two, three, four, five, six, seven. So we can see 10 counters and then seven more counters. Now which of our three numbers did we say was the same as 10 and then seven more? It’s 17. We can check we’re right by counting all the counters. 10 in the first ten frame and then 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17. Our model shows 10 counters and then seven more counters. And so we know the number shown by the model is 17.

What have we learned in this video? We have learned how to read, write, and model the numbers 16 and 17.

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