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Lesson Video: Thirds Mathematics • 2nd Grade

In this video, we will learn how to divide shapes into three equal parts, name each part as a third, and tell the number of thirds in a whole.

06:23

Video Transcript

Thirds

In this video, we will learn how to divide shapes into three equal parts, name each part as a third, and say the number of thirds in a whole.

Here’s a delicious, freshly baked apple pie. If we need to share the pie between three people, we will need to cut the pie into three equal pieces. Equal pieces means that each slice of the pie is the same size. We’ve cut the pie into three equal slices. When we divide a shape into three equal parts, we call each part a third. So, each slice of the pie is a third of the pie. There are three slices or three thirds in a whole pie. Three thirds make one whole.

This circle has been divided into thirds, and one-third has been shaded pink. One-third of the circle is shaded. This semicircle has been divided into thirds, and one-third has been shaded green. We can divide triangles into thirds. How much of this triangle is shaded red? One-third has been shaded. We can also divide squares into thirds and rectangles. So, we’ve learned that a third is one out of three equal parts. We’ve also learned that three thirds make one whole shape. Let’s try some practice questions now to help us identify thirds.

This circle is divided into three equal pieces. What is the name for each piece?

We’re shown a circle which has been divided into three equal pieces. When we divide a shape into three equal parts or three equal pieces, we call each piece or each part a third. The circle has been divided into three equal pieces, and the name for each piece is a third.

This rectangle is divided into three pieces. Is each piece a third?

In this question, we’re shown a rectangle, which has been divided into three pieces. We’re being asked if each piece is a third. This is one of the pieces. Here’s another of the pieces, and here’s the third piece. What do you notice about the pieces of this rectangle? They’re all different shapes, and they’re all different sizes. We can’t call these pieces thirds because a third is when we divide a shape into three equal parts. A third is one of three equal parts. The pieces of our rectangle are not equal. So, the answer to the question “Is each piece a third?” is no. The rectangle has been divided into three pieces, but they’re not equal pieces.

Liam has two-thirds of an orange. Does he have more or less than a whole orange?

We know that Liam has two-thirds of an orange. Does he have more or less than a whole orange? We can imagine that this circle is a whole orange. The circle has been divided into thirds or three equal pieces. If we draw Liam’s two-thirds on our orange, we can see if he has more or less than a whole orange. Here’s one-third, two-thirds. We place Liam’s two-thirds of an orange onto our whole orange. Now, we can see that one-third of the orange is missing. Two-thirds of an orange is less than a whole orange. If Liam has two-thirds of an orange, then he has less than a whole orange.

Hannah has one-third of a rectangle. How many more thirds does she need to make the whole rectangle?

In this question, we’re shown a rectangle. And we’re told that Hannah has shaded one-third of it. We’re asked how many more thirds she needs to make a whole rectangle. We sketched a rectangle and shaded one-third. If we divide a shape into three equal parts, we call each part a third. So, Hannah’s rectangle needs three equal parts. Here’s one, two, three. We’ve divided Hannah’s rectangle into thirds or three equal parts.

Hannah had a third of a rectangle. She needed two more thirds to make a whole rectangle. We know that a third is one of three equal parts. We need three thirds to make one whole shape. If Hannah has one-third of a rectangle, she needs two more thirds to make a whole rectangle.

What have we learned in this video? We’ve learned that when we divide a shape into three equal parts, we call each part a third. We’ve also learned that three thirds make one whole.

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