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Question Video: Determining the Probability of an Event Mathematics

A survey of 92 people found that 55 people support Team A, 30 people support Team B, and 7 people support neither. What is the probability that a person supports Team A?

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Video Transcript

A survey of 92 people found that 55 people support Team A, 30 people support Team B, and seven people support neither. What is the probability that a person supports Team A?

We are given the information about supporters of two teams. 55 people support Team A and 30 people support Team B. And we are also told that seven people support neither Team A nor Team B. We need to use this information to find the probability that a person supports Team A. And to do this, we will use experimental probability.

In general, the experimental probability of an event is equal to the number of trials in which the outcome occurs over the total number of trials. However, in this context, we can think of this as the probability that a person supports Team A is equal to the number of people surveyed who support Team A over the total number of people surveyed.

Using the information, we know that 55 people support Team A. And we were given that there were 92 people surveyed in total. But even if we hadn’t been given this information, we could have added the people in the three different groups, which are 55, 30, and seven people. And that would also have given us the total number of people surveyed as 92. We can’t simplify this fraction any further, so the probability that a person supports Team A is 55 over 92.

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