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Lesson Video: Telling Time in Words: Nearest Five Minuted Mathematics

In this video, we will learn how to tell time to the nearest five minutes on analog clocks and record the time in words.

12:33

Video Transcript

Telling Time in Words: Nearest Five Minutes

In this video, we’re going to learn how to tell the time on an analog clock to the nearest five minutes. This is an analog clock. An analog clock has a face which we read to tell the time. Analog clocks have two hands. The longest hand on the clock face is called the minute hand. This is the hand we’re going to be looking at in this video because we’re learning how to tell the time to the nearest five minutes. The shortest of the two hands is called the hour hand, and we use this to read the hour.

Let’s look more closely at the minute hand. When a new hour begins, the minute hand is always pointing at number 12. So when the minute hand is pointing at 12, we know it’s something o’clock. The minute hand turns around the clock in minutes. Each of the divisions on the clock face is worth one minute, one, two, three, four, five. Each of the larger divisions on a clock face is worth five minutes. Five, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60. We know there are 60 minutes in one hour. Once the minute hand reaches 12 again, we start all over again.

In this video, we’re going to learn how to tell the time to the nearest five minutes. Let’s learn how to read the time to the nearest five minutes in words. We already know that when the minute hand is pointing to number 12, it means it’s something o’clock. If the hour hand was pointing to number eight, we would know it was 8 o’clock. If the minute hand moves to number one, how many minutes have passed? Well, we know that each of these divisions marked with a pink dot is worth five minutes. If five minutes have passed since o’clock, we can say that it’s 5 past the hour. And in another five minutes, it will be 10 past the hour.

What comes next if we’re counting in fives? Five, 10, 15. When we’re telling the time on an analog clock, we don’t say 15 minutes past. We call this time quarter past. This is because the minute hand has turned a quarter of the way around the clock, from number 12 to number three. If the minute hand moves another five minutes, how many minutes have passed? Five, 10, 15, 20. And we write this as 20 past. In five more minutes, it’s 25 past.

You might think that because we’re counting around the clock in fives that next it’s 30 past. Five, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30. It’s true that 30 minutes have passed, but the minute hand has also turned halfway around the clock, from number 12 to number six. So this is half past the hour. If the minute hand is pointing anywhere between number 12 and number six, we write this as minutes past the hour. 5 past, 10 past, quarter past, 20 past, 25 past, and half past.

When we’re reading the minute hand on the second half of the clock from number six back to number 12, we write this as minutes to the next hour. So if the minute hand was pointing to number seven, how many minutes are there until we reach o’clock? Five, 10, 15, 20, 25. We write this as “25 to,” and we mean 25 minutes to the next hour. Five less than 25 is 20. We’ve got five, 10, 15, 20 minutes until the next hour. You might be mistaken into thinking that we write the next time as 15 minutes to. It might help if we were to divide the clock into quarters. Then you’d be able to see that there’s quarter of an hour until o’clock. So we write this as quarter to. The minute hand has to make a quarter of a turn to get to o’clock.

If the minute hand moves forward another five minutes, it will be 10 to the hour: five, 10. And if another five minutes pass, it will be 5 to the hour. And in another five minutes, it will be o’clock. The minute hand has made a full turn around the clock.

Let’s recap what we’ve learned so far. We’ve learned that each of the intervals marked on this clock face with a pink dot are worth five minutes. We’ve also learned that we start counting at o’clock. When a quarter of an hour has passed, we say it’s quarter past the hour. We’ve learned that when the minute hand has turned from number 12 to number six, it’s made half a turn around the clock face, and we call this half past. When the minute hand is pointing to number nine, it has to make a quarter of a turn to reach o’clock, and we call this time quarter to the hour. And we’ve learned that we write all the other times on the analog clock as minutes past or minutes to the hour. 5 past, 10 past, 20 past, 25 past, 25 to, 20 to, 10 to, and 5 to.

Now that we’ve learned how to tell the time to the nearest five minutes on an analog clock face, let’s practice telling the time.

Skip count in fives to find how many minutes after 2 o’clock it is.

In this question, we’re shown the time on an analog clock. And we’re asked to find how many minutes after 2 o’clock it is. We know that it’s something past 2 o’clock because the hour hand is just after the number two on the clock. To find out how many minutes after 2 o’clock it is, we need to look at the minute hand. And we can see it’s pointing to the number five. To help us work out how many minutes have passed since 2 o’clock, we’re told to skip count in fives. So we have to start at the number 12, which is o’clock, and skip count in fives. Five, 10, 15, 20, 25. It is 25 minutes after 2 o’clock. We found the answer by skip counting in fives: five, 10, 15, 20, 25. It’s 25 minutes past 2 o’clock.

What time is it? Find the missing numbers. It is what minutes to what.

In this question, we’re shown an analog clock. We have to read the clock to work out what time it is and then find the missing numbers. First, we’ll need to look at the minute hand to work out how many minutes it is until the next o’clock. Then we’ll need to read the hour hand. The minute hand is pointing to number eight on the clock face. How many minutes does the minute hand have to turn until it reaches the next hour or o’clock?

Well, we know that when the minute hand is pointing to number 12, that means it’s something o’clock. So we have to count how many minutes there are from number eight until number 12 on the clock face. And we know that each of these divisions is worth five minutes. So we could start at number eight and count in fives until we reach number 12 on the clock. Five, 10, 15, 20. So we know that it’s 20 minutes until the next hour. Let’s have a look at the hour hand now. The hour hand is pointing between the numbers five and six, so we know that it’s after 5 o’clock, but it’s not quite 6 o’clock. So the time on the clock is 20 minutes to 6. The missing numbers are 20 and 6. It is 20 minutes to 6.

What time is it? Find the missing numbers. It is what minutes after what.

In this question, we’re shown an analog clock. We have to read the time on the clock and fill in the missing numbers. First, we have to look at the minute hand to work out how many minutes it is past or after the hour. The minute hand is shown in orange on this clock. And to find out how many minutes past it is, we’ll need to start at number 12 or o’clock and count around the clock face in five-minute intervals until we reach the minute hand. Let’s count in fives: five, 10, 15, 20.

Now we know it is 20 minutes, but we don’t know the hour. 20 minutes past what? So we just need to look at the hour hand. This is the hour hand. Which hour has the hour hand just gone past. It’s the number six. It is 20 minutes after 6, so the two missing numbers are 20 and 6. The time is 20 minutes after 6.

What have we learned in this video? We have learned how to tell the time to the nearest five minutes on an analog clock.

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