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Question Video: Contrasting Reproduction in Yeast and Bacteria Biology

How does asexual reproduction in yeast differ from asexual reproduction in bacteria? [A] In yeast, mitosis does not occur during the fission process. [B] In yeast, daughter cells are formed by parthenogenesis. [C] In yeast, the process generates multicellular offspring. [D] In yeast, there is no growth and separation of a cell wall. [E] In yeast, the daughter cell forms from a small outgrowth in the original cell.

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Video Transcript

How does asexual reproduction in yeast differ from asexual reproduction in bacteria? (A) In yeast, mitosis does not occur during the fission process. (B) In yeast, daughter cells are formed by parthenogenesis. (C) In yeast, the process generates multicellular offspring. (D) In yeast, there is no growth and separation of a cell wall. Or (E) in yeast, the daughter cell forms from a small outgrowth in the original cell.

This question asks us about two single-celled organisms that undergo asexual reproduction: yeast and bacteria. Can you remember what asexual reproduction is? Asexual reproduction is the process whereby only one parent produces offspring that are genetically identical to the parent that produced them. Therefore, asexual reproduction always involves the duplication of parental DNA in order to transmit a complete copy to each daughter cell.

Bacterial DNA is found in the form of a circular chromosome and small loops of plasmid DNA. Yeast are single-celled eukaryotic fungi, so their DNA is found within a membrane-bound nucleus. There are a few ways that parental cells can split to divide their genetic information into two cells through asexual reproduction. Bacteria usually reproduce asexually through a process called binary fission. This occurs when the cell becomes elongated as it duplicates its DNA. Eventually, the cytoplasm is split along the middle through a process called cytokinesis, producing two genetically identical daughter cells.

Yeast can reproduce through a different asexual process called budding. Budding occurs when a small outgrowth on the parent cell begins to grow larger and larger. Eventually, the parent cell will duplicate its genetic information and partition one nucleus to the small outgrowth. This outgrowth, or bud, will eventually separate itself from the parent cell, producing two yeast cells with identical genetic material.

After reviewing how these two different organisms can reproduce asexually, we should be able to answer our question correctly. The way that asexual reproduction in yeast differs from asexual reproduction in bacteria is (E). In yeast, the daughter cell forms from a small outgrowth in the original cell.

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