Video: Comparing Numbers up to 10 Using Words

In this video, we will learn how to compare numbers up to 10 by considering the counting sequence or modelling with counters and use words to record the result.

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Video Transcript

Comparing Numbers up to 10 Using Words

In this video, we’re going to learn how to compare numbers up to 10 by thinking about the counting sequence or modelling with counters. And the way that we’re going to describe our comparisons and record our results is using words. Two of these bears here are holding number cards. We can see the number five and six. Let’s compare these two numbers together. One way we can compare numbers like this is by using maths equipment to help, maybe cubes or counters. Let’s use counters.

First, we’ll make the number five. One, two, three, four, five. Now, we can model the number six in the same way. If we line each counter up, it’ll help us to compare them. One, two, three, four, five, six counters. What can we see about our lines of counters? Our line of five counters is shorter than the line of six counters. This means there must be less counters in this line. And so we can compare our two numbers using words. We can use the phrase, is less than. Five is less than six. Let’s make a note of that phrase. We’re going to be using it in the video.

Now, what if our second number changes? Let’s compare the numbers five and two this time. As well as modelling numbers using counters, we could also use a number track to help. The useful thing about number tracks is that they show numbers in order from smallest to largest. So we can use them to compare numbers. Let’s count along our number track and see where we say our numbers five and two. One, two, three, four, five. Did you notice as we counted, we said the number two before we got to the number five. We said the number five after we said the number two. This means that five is a larger number than two.

So how could we compare these numbers using words? You know, the word greater is another way of saying larger or bigger. So we can say five is greater than two. But what if both our bears’ number cards say the number five on them? We can’t use any of the words we’ve talked about already. We can’t say five is less than five or even five is greater than five. If we look at our number track, we can see we’re talking about the same number. So we could say five is the same as five. Another way of saying numbers are the same is by using the word equal. We can say five is equal to five. They’re exactly the same. Now, we’ve gone through three different ways to describe comparisons using words. Let’s put them into practice and have a go at some questions.

Look at the numbers: four, three. Pick the missing words. Three is what four and four is what three. And we’re given two sets of words to choose from, greater than and less than.

In this question, we’re told to look at two numbers. There’s the number four, and underneath it is the number three. Look at how these numbers are represented in two different ways. Firstly, each number is written as a digit and then a line of blocks. Each line of blocks matches the digit. For example, four blocks represent the number four and three blocks represent the number three. You could tell this by counting the blocks. One, two, three, four in the first row. One, two, three in the second row. My question gives us two sentences and asks us to pick the missing words to fill in the gaps.

Let’s look at our first phrase. Three is what four. Should we say three is greater than four or three is less than four? Let’s use the blocks we can see to help us. That’s why they’re there. What can we say about each line of blocks? We can see that the line of four blocks is longer than the line of three blocks. Or if we look at it the other way, the line of three blocks is shorter than the line of four blocks. It contains less blocks. So we can use this to help us to compare the numbers three and four. We can say that the number three is a smaller number than four. And so we can use the phrase, less than. Three is less than four.

We can also use our blocks to help us fill in the second phrase. Four is what three. As we’ve said already, the line of four blocks is longer than the line of three blocks. There are more blocks. We know that four must be more than three. And so we can use the phrase greater than to compare the two numbers together. We can say four is greater than three. The numbers four and three were modelled for us using blocks. And we use this to help us to compare them. We can say three is less than four and four is greater than three.

Think about the numbers seven and nine. Sophia showed the number seven in a ten frame. How can she show the number nine? Which number is less?

This question gets us to compare two numbers, seven and nine. And we’re told that Sophia showed the number seven in a ten frame. And we’re shown a picture of this, so we know how she does it. She’s taken seven counters and she’s put them one in each square. There are one two, three, four, five, six, seven altogether. She makes one full row of counters and there are two extra counters underneath. Now, we’re asked two questions. And the first question asks us, how can she show the number nine? Well, instead of putting seven counters on a ten frame, Sophia is going to need to put nine counters on a ten frame, one in each square. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine. This is how Sophia can show the number nine.

In our second question, we need to compare these two numbers together because we’re asked which number is less. And when we use the word less, we’re talking about something being smaller than something else. So which number is the smaller of the two, seven or nine? Let’s compare our ten frames. The top row on both ten frames is full. And as we’ve said already, there are two extra counters on the row underneath for the number seven. But when we look at the number nine, we can see that there are more than two counters on the second row. In fact, the second row is nearly full. The number nine very nearly fills the ten frame. And so we can say that the number seven is less than or is smaller than the number nine. Sophia can show the number nine by putting nine counters on a ten frame. And we can then compare our ten frames to show that the number that is less is the number seven.

What number is greater than six and less than eight?

There’s a mystery number being described in this question and we’re given two clues about it. We need to find a number that’s greater than six and also less than eight. Let’s look at each clue one by one and then put them together. Firstly, we know that the word greater means more or larger. So we’re looking for a number that is larger or more than six. Let’s use a number track to help us. Now, if we’re looking for numbers that are greater than six, we need to start by finding the number six. Where is it on our number track? Well, we know it comes after the number five: one, two, three, four, five, six.

Now, where are the numbers that are greater than six? What about the numbers that we say before we get to the number six? One, two, three, four, and five. Are these numbers greater than six? No, we know that numbers get bigger as we count along a number track. And so if we’re looking for numbers that are bigger or greater than six, we need to look at the numbers that come after the number six. Seven is greater than six. So is the number eight, nine, and 10. What about the number six itself? Should we include this? Well, no. The number six is the same as the number six, isn’t it? When two numbers are the same, we can say that they’re equal to each other. The number six is equal to the number six. It’s not greater than six.

So we can say that the number we’re looking for could be seven, eight, nine, or 10. But remember, we’ve got another clue to think about. Our number is greater than six and less than eight. Let’s sketch another number track to help us find numbers less than eight. First of all, let’s find the number eight on our number track. We know it comes after the number seven. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight. And we’re looking for numbers that are less than eight. Another way of thinking about the word less than is smaller than, numbers that are smaller than eight. And again, we’re not going to include the number eight itself here because eight is equal to eight.

Now, where are the numbers that are going to be smaller than eight on our number track? These are going to be the numbers that come before we say the number eight, numbers like one. One is less than eight and also two, three, four, five, six, and seven. All these numbers are less than eight. Now, we can look closely at our number tracks to find the answer. What number is greater than six and less than eight? We can see that there’s only one number that we’ve circled on both number tracks. It’s the number seven. We can say seven is greater than six. And we can also say that seven is less than eight. We used number tracks and thinking about the counting sequence to help us find the answer. The number that is greater than six and less than eight is seven.

So what have we learned in this video? Well, firstly, we’ve learned how to compare numbers up to 10. And we used things like number tracks and counters to do that. And we’ve then described our results for things that we’ve found out using words. We used words like is less than, is equal to, and is greater than.

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