Video: Making 11, 12, and 13

In this video, we will learn how to decompose the numbers 11, 12, and 13 into ten ones and some remaining ones.

08:17

Video Transcript

Making 11, 12, and 13

In this video, we’re going to learn how to decompose the numbers 11, 12, and 13 into 10 ones and some remaining ones. Because we’re going to be thinking about how to make the numbers 11, 12, and 13 in this video, let’s start by reminding ourselves how to count to these numbers and where they belong. These meerkats are going to help us. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10. You know, we can think of the number 10 as being the same as a group of 10 ones.

Let’s carry on counting because the numbers 11, 12, and 13 come next. After 10 comes 11. 11 is the same as 10 ones and one more one. And the number after 11 is 12. The number 12 is the same as 10 ones and another two more ones. And then finally, after 12 comes the number 13. And we can make 13 by putting together 10 ones and another three extra ones. So we can make the numbers 11, 12, and 13 by putting together a group of 10 ones with some more ones. 10 ones and one more one makes 11. 10 ones and two more ones makes 12. And 10 ones and three more ones makes 13. Let’s have a go at answering some questions now where we have to make the numbers 11, 12, and 13. And we’re gonna make them by making a group of 10 ones and then some more ones.

Which picture shows the number 11?

In this question, we’re given three different sets of ten frames. And we’re asked which of these pictures shows a number. Now, we know when we write a digit one next to another digit one, we’ve written the number 11. So which of our pictures is a way to model the number 11? Now, we could think that it’s our first picture. We can see one counter on the first ten frame and one counter on the second ten frame. And of course, if we write the digits one and one next to each other, we write the number 11.

Can we see 11 counters? Of course not. We can only see two. Instead, we need to think a little bit more carefully about how to make 11. Now, we know the number 11 is the number that comes after 10. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10, 11. So we can show the number 11 by making 10 ones and also one more one. Which of our pictures shows 10 ones and one more one? Well, it’s this picture here, isn’t it? We can see a full ten frame. This is the same as 10 counters or 10 ones. And then we can see one more one sitting on its own in the second ten frame. The picture that shows the number 11 is the one that shows 10 ones and one more one left over.

How many counters are there? Complete the sentence. There are 10 ones and what left over.

And you know, one way to find out how many counters there are would be to start with the number one and just count them all one by one. One, two, three, and so on. But you know, there’s a quicker way to find the answer, and that’s by looking at how the counters have been arranged. To begin with, we can see a ten frame. And it’s not just any old ten frame; this is a full ten frame. There’s a counter in every space. And so we know if it’s a full ten frame, this is the same as 10 ones.

So rather than starting with the number one, we could count the whole ten frame as 10 and then start counting from the number 10. 10, 11, 12, 13. This was much quicker than starting with one, wasn’t it? We just had to say the numbers 10, 11, 12, 13. There are 13 counters, so we can answer the first part of the question by writing the number 13. And we do that by writing the digits one and three next to each other.

In the next part of the problem, we’re given a sentence to complete. There are 10 ones and what left over. We’ve already talked about the 10 ones. They’re the ones in the ten frame. But how many do we have left over if we have 13? There are one, two, three counters that aren’t in the ten frame. So we can complete the sentence using the number three. We found that there were 13 counters. And this means that there are 10 ones and three left over.

Count the objects and then complete the sentence. I have 10 ones and what more ones.

In the picture, we can see a group of American footballs, and we’re told to count the objects first of all. So let’s do that. Let’s write a number by each football as we count them. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10, 11, 12. There are 12 footballs altogether, and this is going to help us to complete the sentence. Now, the sentence says, I have 10 ones and what more ones. And we know we have 12 footballs.

So really, what we’re being asked is, how do we make the number 12 out of a group of 10 ones and how many more ones? To help us, we could draw a box around the group of 10 ones. So here are 10 ones. We could even make it look like a ten frame. So if we have 12 footballs, we have 10 ones and how many more ones. Let’s count them. There are one, two more ones. We know that 10 ones and two more ones make 12. And because we have 12 footballs, we can say, I have 10 ones and two more ones.

Now, what have we learned in this video? We’ve learned how to split the numbers 11, 12, and 13 into 10 ones and some remaining ones.

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