Video: Understanding Place Value When Comparing Numbers up to 999

Complete the following table with true and false.

02:59

Video Transcript

Complete the following table with true and false. Number 983, its hundreds digit is nine. Its tens digit is nine. The number is smaller than 900. The number is greater than 900.

We can see that the number that our table is talking about has three digits, nine, eight, three. If we were to represent this number using mass equipment, we’d need to have three ones, eight tens, and nine hundreds, 983. Understanding this fact can help us to complete the first two empty spaces in our table. This is because the first two statements are to do with the place value of the digit nine in our number. The first statement says that the hundreds digit in our number is nine. Is this true or false?

Let’s write the digits in our number underneath the correct column, 900, 80, three. We can see that the digit in the hundreds place of our number is the number nine. The first statement is true. The second statement in the table tells us that the number’s tens digit is nine. Well, if we look at the tens place in our number, we can see that their digit in that place is eight. This’s why it represents 80. So if we say that tens digit is nine, this statement is false.

The final two statements in our table are to do with how large our number is. If we were to mark the number 983 on a number line, it would be between 901 and 1000. It could be about here on the number line. So although our number contains nine hundreds, it’s larger than 900 because it also contains eight tens and three ones. So the statement, the number is smaller than 900 is false. 983 is not smaller than 900. We know that it’s greater than 900. So this final statement is true. The digit nine in our number is worth nine hundreds not nine tens. And we know that the number is not smaller than 900; it’s greater than 900. We’ve used our knowledge of place value to help find the answer. From left to right, we completed the table with the words true, false, false, and true.

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