Video: Using Part-Whole Models to Solve Addition Word Problems with Numbers up to 100

Chloe scored 41 points in a sports competition. Madison scored 28 points more than Chloe. We want to find out how many points Madison scored. We can use a part-part-whole diagram to model this problem. Is Madison’s score the whole or the other part? How many points did Madison score?

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Video Transcript

Chloe scored 41 points in a sports competition. Madison scored 28 points more than Chloe. We want to find out how many points Madison scored. We can use a part-part-whole diagram to model this problem. And then we can answer the questions: is Madison’s score the whole or the other part? And how many points did Madison score?

Here’s our part-part-whole diagram. We know that the yellow part represents 28 points. We also know that Madison scored 28 points more than Chloe. That means Chloe’s points plus 28 points will tell us how many points Madison scored.

Our problem tells us that Chloe scored 41 points. The blue part of our diagram is 41 points. And that means that the whole diagram — the blue part and the yellow part — will represent Madison’s points. Madison’s score is the whole.

By finding the sum of the two parts — adding 41 plus 28, we will find how many points Madison scored: one plus eight equals nine, four plus two equals six. Madison scored 69 points.

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