Video: KS1-M19 • Paper 2 • Question 9

Match each egg box to the correct multiplication. One is done for you. [A] 6 × 2 [B] 5 × 3 [C] 3 × 2 [D] 5 × 2

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Video Transcript

Match each egg box to the correct multiplication. One is done for you. And then, we can see a diagram of four egg boxes and four different multiplications. Six times two, five times three, three times two, and five times two.

When we learn multiplication facts, we often use arrays to help us. This array has four in a row. And there are two rows. So it shows the multiplication four times two. Well, instead of using counters or cubes, did you know we can use eggs! And in this problem, each egg box is an array. Each egg box shows a different multiplication and the first one has been done for us.

Let’s count the number of eggs in each row: one, two, three. There are three eggs in a row. But how many rows are there? One, two. Three eggs in a row and there are two rows. So we can match the first egg box with the multiplication fact three times two. And we know that three times two is six. And there are six eggs in the first box.

Let’s look at the second egg box. We can see without counting that there are two rows again. So we’re looking for multiplications, something multiplied by two. But how many eggs are there in each row? One, two, three, four, five. There are five eggs in a row and there are two rows. Which multiplication shows five two times? Five multiplied by two. We know five times two equals 10. And if we count the eggs, we can see that there are 10 eggs altogether.

We don’t need to the next egg box because we can see that it has two rows of eggs again. And there is only one multiplication fact that shows a number multiplied by two, six times two. Although we think we know what the answer is, it’s always good to count, just to be sure. One, two, three, four, five, six. Six eggs in a row and there are two rows, six multiplied by two. We know that six times two is 12. And if we count the eggs, we can see that there are 12 eggs.

There’s only one more multiplication left. And we know we must be right. There are three rows of eggs and it’s the only egg box with three rows of eggs. And we can see that all of the other multiplications are multiplying by two. The one that’s left is multiplying by three. Five eggs in a row and there are three rows altogether, five multiplied by three.

To find the answer, we looked at the number of eggs in each row and the number of rows that there were and we used this to find the correct multiplications. The first egg box was done already for us. The second egg box shows five times two. The third egg box shows six times two. And the final egg box shows five times three.

And the next time you have some eggs in your fridge at home, have a look at them. There are two multiplications here that they could look like and they’re a good way of learning your times tables.

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