Lesson Video: Graphs and Tables | Nagwa Lesson Video: Graphs and Tables | Nagwa

Lesson Video: Graphs and Tables Mathematics • First Year of Primary School

In this video, we will learn how to sort objects into groups in a table to make a graph and then count the objects to find the number in each group.

11:32

Video Transcript

Graphs and Tables

In this video, we’re going to learn how to sort objects into groups in a table to make a graph and then count the objects to find the number in each group.

This class are going on a minibeast hunt. They’re going out into the garden to try and find as many insects as they can. The children are going to work in pairs. And their teacher has asked them to keep a tally chart. Each time they spot an insect, they have to record it in their tally chart. In this column of the tally chart, we can see the types of insects that the children need to look for. Let’s look at the categories in the tally chart or the different types of insect.

They’re looking for bees, butterflies, ants, beetles, and caterpillars. Each time they spot a new insect, they need to record it by drawing a tally mark in the correct column. Oh dear! Looks like the bee has scared the children away, but they did remember to record a tally in the column next to the bee. Where should the children record the caterpillar? Right here. How many ants can you see? Here’s one. Let’s make our tally mark. One, two, we made our second tally mark, three.

The children stay outside for half an hour and record all the insects they see in their tally chart. Here are the results of their minibeast hunt. How many bees did they see? They saw six. There’s a five and one more. Five and one make six. They have six tallies, which means they saw a total of six bees. They saw a total of three butterflies, eight ants, two beetles, and four caterpillars. Now the children are going back to the classroom to make a graph. They’re going to need their tally chart to help them draw their graph.

The children are recording their results in a picture graph. The title of the graph is “Number of Insects.” And we can see the categories or types of insects in this column here: bees, butterflies, ants, beetles, and caterpillars. They’re going to record the total number for each category using pictures to represent one insect. So let’s start with the first category, bees. They saw a total of six bees, so we need to draw six bees. One, two, three, four, five, six. They saw three butterflies, eight ants, two beetles, and four caterpillars.

Now their teacher has asked them two questions. Which insect did you see the most of in the garden? And which type of insect did you see the least? Which type of insect did the children see the most of? This row is the longest. There are eight ants. There are more ants than bees, butterflies, beetles, and caterpillars. So the children can say that the insect they saw most is the ants.

Which insect did they see the least of? Which category has the smallest number of insects on the graph? It’s the beetles. They only saw two beetles, which is less than the number of bees they saw, the number of butterflies they saw, the number of ants they saw, and the number of caterpillars they saw. We can tell this because this has the shortest row of pictures on our graph. The children have learned that the most common insect in their garden is ants and the least common insect is beetles.

Let’s practice what we’ve learned about graphs with some questions.

The graph shows a class’s favorite sports. How many students prefer soccer? How many students prefer baseball?

In this question, we have to read the information shown in this graph. The title of the graph is “Class’s Favorite Sports.” Children were asked if they prefer soccer or baseball. The number of children who preferred soccer is shown with footballs. The number of footballs tells us the number of children who preferred soccer.

To answer this first question, we need to count the number of footballs. That will tell us how many children preferred soccer. There’s one, two, three, four, five, six. The number of students who prefer soccer is six. Now we need to count the baseballs to find out how many students preferred baseball. One, two, three, four. The number of students who prefer baseball is four.

The table shows the animals in Jackson’s farm. Which animal is the greatest in number? Is it dogs, sheep, or cows?

In this question, we have to read the information shown in the table. And we’re told that the table shows the different types of animals in Jackson’s farm. This row of the table shows us the number of dogs in Jackson’s farm. This row shows the number of cows in Jackson’s farm. And this row shows the number of sheep. Which type of animal has the greatest number?

How can we tell? Which row has the longest line of animals? Is it the dogs, the sheep, or the cows? It’s the sheep. The row of sheep is longer than the row of cows and it’s longer than the row of dogs. This means that there are more sheep than there are cows or dogs in Jackson’s farm. The animal which is the greatest in number is the sheep.

The table shows the number of students who go to school by bus, by car, and on foot. Which of the following graphs matches the table?

In this question, we have to find the graph that matches the information in this table. Let’s look more closely at the information shown in the table. The information in this row of the table tells us that nine students go to school by bus. This row tells us that four children go to school by car. And this row shows us the number of students who travel to school on foot, which is seven. Which of these three graphs matches the table?

We know the number of students who travel to school by bus is nine, so this row needs to have nine buses. So let’s count them. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine. The number of buses in this graph matches the number of buses in the table. Does this graph show four cars? One, two, three, four. Yes, it does. Does this row show that seven children travel to school on foot? Let’s check. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight. This graph doesn’t match the table.

Does this graph match the table? Can you see that this graph has less pictures of buses than the first? This graph only shows seven students traveling to school by bus. It does show four students traveling by car and seven students on foot, but we’re looking for the graph that matches the table, nine buses, four cars, and seven students traveling to school on foot.

Let’s check the final graph. This graph shows the same number of buses as the first graph, nine. There are four cars and seven students on foot. This is the graph that matches the table. This graph shows that nine students travel to school by bus, four students travel to school by car, and seven students travel to school on foot. This graph matches the information in the table.

What have we learned in this video? We’ve learned how to draw tally charts and picture graphs. And we’ve also learned how to read the information presented in tables, charts, and picture graphs.

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