Question Video: Comparing Two Numbers Using “Less than," "More than," or "Equal To” Mathematics • Kindergarten

Olivia is counting beads on a string. Complete using “more than”, “less than”, or “equal to”: The number of blue beads is _ the number of red beads.

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Video Transcript

Olivia is counting beads on a string. Complete using more than, less than, or equal to. The number of blue beads is what the number of red beads.

This question is all about comparing two groups together. Can you see the two groups of objects that we’re looking at? It’s the beads that are on this string. There are a group of blue beads and a group of red beads. And we need to compare the group of blue beads with the group of red beads because we’re given a sentence to complete: the number of blue beads is what the number of red beads. Is it more than the number of red beads? Is it less than the number of red beads? Or are the two groups the same? Is the number of blue beads equal to the number of red beads?

Perhaps if these were objects in real life, maybe beads or counters, we could compare them by matching them up. But in this question, this is just a picture of the objects. So how can we compare these groups? Let’s count them. How many blue beads can we see? One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10, 11, 12. The group of blue beads contains 12 beads. And the group of red beads contains one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10, 11, 12. This is interesting. We counted 12 blue beads but also 12 red beads. These groups are exactly the same size.

So are we going to use more than, less than, or equal to to compare our groups? Well, we know that the word “equal” means the “same as.” Both groups contain 12 beads. And so we can say the number of blue beads is equal to the number of red beads. Our missing words are “equal to.”

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