Lesson Video: Tally Marks Mathematics • 2nd Grade

In this video, we will learn how to read a tally chart to solve simple put-together, take-apart, and compare problems.

10:43

Video Transcript

Tally Charts

In this video, we will learn how to read information in tally charts. The owner of this ice cream van sells lots of ice creams. He wants to know which flavor of ice cream is the most popular. Each time he sells an ice cream, he records the flavor. Every time he sells a vanilla ice cream, he adds a tally to the chart. This is how many ice creams he’d sold by the end of the day. He can use his tally chart to work out which is the most popular flavor of ice cream.

This row shows how many vanilla ice creams he sold. When we use tally marks, this is how we show the number five. The ice cream seller sold two lots of five vanilla ice creams, which means he sold 10 vanilla ice creams. Two fives are 10. How many tally marks are there next to chocolate? How many chocolate ice creams were sold? Five and three more makes eight. He sold 12 strawberry ice creams, 13 mint, and 17 bubble gum–flavored ice creams. Which flavor of ice cream was the most popular?

We can look in this column of the tally chart to help us find the answer. Which flavor ice cream has the most tally marks? It’s the bubble gum flavor. 17 bubble gum ice creams were sold. The least popular ice cream flavor was chocolate. Tally charts were a really useful way of counting the number of something. It’s really quick and easy to count using tally marks. In this video, we’re going to learn how to read the information in tally charts, just like this one. Let’s try some practice questions.

Michael conducted a survey to determine the favorite type of sandwiches of students in his class. The results of the survey are shown in this tally chart. Which sandwiches are more popular than peanut butter?

In this question, we’re shown the results of Michael’s survey. He surveyed or asked the students in his class for their favorite type of sandwich. And he recorded his results in a tally chart. This row of the tally chart tells us the different type of sandwiches. He asked children if their favorite sandwich was turkey, roast beef, tuna salad, peanut butter, or ham. In the second row of the tally chart, he recorded the number of children who said this was their favorite type of sandwich.

How many children like turkey sandwiches the best? We know that this is how we write five using tally marks. There’s one five and two more tally marks. We know that five plus two is seven. Only one person liked roast beef sandwiches the best. How many children liked tuna salad the most? Five and one more is six. Eight children liked peanut butter the most, and 10 children like ham sandwiches the most.

The question is asking us which type of sandwiches are more popular than peanut butter? If we look closely at the tally chart, we can see that eight children liked peanut butter the best. Which type of sandwich is more popular than peanut butter? We need to find the type of sandwich which has more than eight tally marks. It’s ham. Eight children like peanut butter, and 10 like ham. We know that 10 is more than eight. The type of sandwich which is more popular than peanut butter is ham.

The tally chart shows a group of students’ favorite superheroes. How many people prefer Wolverine or Spider-Man?

We’re shown a tally chart. Children were asked to pick their favorite superhero: Wolverine, Superman, Wonder Woman, or Spider-Man. How many children liked Wolverine best? It’s five. When we’re counting tally marks, this is how we show five. One, two, three, four, five. Four students liked Superman best. Four students also picked Wonder Woman. And three students chose Spider-Man.

The question asks, how many people prefer Wolverine or Spider-Man? We know that five students chose Wolverine and three chose Spider-Man. If five students prefer Wolverine and three students prefer Spider-Man, we know that eight students preferred Wolverine or Spider-Man because five and three equals eight. We read the information in the tally chart and used it to help us solve the problem.

The tally chart shows a group of students’ favorite superheroes. Were 14 students surveyed?

We know the tally chart shows us a group of students’ favorite superheroes: Wolverine, Superman, Wonder Woman, and Spider-Man. The tally marks tell us the number of students who chose this superhero. There are two tally marks for Wolverine, which means that two students chose Wolverine. Three students chose Superman. One chose Wonder Woman, and eight chose Spider-Man.

The question is asking us if a total number of 14 students were surveyed. If we add together the number of students that liked each superhero, that will tell us the total number of students surveyed. We know that two plus three is five. Five plus one is six. And six plus eight equals 14, so 14 students were surveyed. The answer to the question is yes. Two plus three plus one plus eight gives us a total of 14. So, 14 students were asked their favorite superhero.

Daniel recorded the number of glasses of juice he sells in his neighborhood each day in this tally chart. How many more glasses were sold on Thursday than Friday and Monday combined?

We know the tally chart tells us the number of glasses of juice Daniel sells in his neighborhood each day. How many glasses of juice did he sell on Monday? We know that this is how we show five using tally marks. We know that five plus two gives us a total of seven. How many did he sell on Tuesday? We’ve got two fives plus four more, which makes 14. On Wednesday, there are three fives plus one more: five, 10, 15, 16. He sold a lot of juice on Thursday: five, 10, 15, 20, and one more makes 21. On Friday, he sold five, 10 glasses of juice.

The question asks us how many more glasses of juice were sold on Thursday than on Friday and Monday combined. To combine the number of glasses he sold on Friday and Monday, we need to add these two totals together. On Friday, Daniel sold 10 glasses of juice. And on Monday, he sold seven. We know that 10 plus seven is 17. We know that 21 glasses of juice were sold on Thursday.

Now, we need to find the difference between 21 and 17. To find the difference, we could count forward starting at 17 until we reach 21. One, two, three, four. The difference between 17 and 21 is four. Four more glasses of juice were sold on Thursday than Friday and Monday combined. We read the information in the tally chart and used it to help us solve the problem.

What have we learned in this video? We’ve learned how to read information in tally charts and how to use tally charts to solve word problems.

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