Video: Regrouping Ones into Tens and Ones

Benjamin and Amelia are counting the blue cubes. They know that 10 ones make a ten. Now it is your turn. Look at the orange cubes and answer the questions. How many tens are there? How many ones are left? How many cubes are there in total?

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Video Transcript

Benjamin and Amelia are counting the blue cubes. They know that 10 ones make a 10. Benjamin is saying there are two tens. There are three ones left over. and Amelia is saying there are 23 cubes. We’re then asked a question based on this. Now, it is your turn. Look at the orange cubes and answer the questions. And we’re asked three questions. How many tens are there? How many ones are left? And then how many cubes are there in total?

Before we start answering these questions, let’s go back and see what Benjamin and Amelia had to say about the blue cubes. This will help us. Read through the first two sentences to yourself again. Can you see the part that’s really important? The important piece of information is that 10 ones make a 10. That’s what these two characters have done here. They’ve grouped their cubes into tens. And by doing this, they’ve ended up with some cubes left over. The left over cubes aren’t enough to make another 10. So that’s why Benjamin is saying there are two tens. There are three ones left over.

So how does Amelia know that there are 23 cubes? So how does Amelia know how many cubes there are? Well, she can count in tens and then in ones. Let’s show this on a number line. We start at zero. And let’s count those two tens, 10, 20. Now, let’s count on three ones — 21, 22, and 23. And that’s how Amelia knows there’re 23 cubes. She counted in tens and then ones. So let’s use this idea and answer the questions about the orange cubes.

Let’s apply what we’ve learnt so far. We have a different number of orange cubes. But you can see that they’ve already been sorted into groups of 10. Our first question asks us, how many tens are there? What we can see that there are four tens. But like before, we have some cubes left over not enough to make another 10. And so our second question asked, how many ones are left? And if we count those, we can see that there are two ones left. There are four tens and two ones.

Our final question asks us, how many cubes are there in total? How can we find the answer? Well, we can count four tens and then two ones. Let’s show this again on a number line. So we start at zero and count four tens — 10, 20, 30, and 40. Four tens are 40. Now, let’s count on our two ones, 41 and 42. So instead of counting each individual cube, we can group them into tens and ones which helps us count them much more quickly, four tens and two ones. There are 42 cubes in total.

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