Lesson Video: Word Problems: Putting Objects Together | Nagwa Lesson Video: Word Problems: Putting Objects Together | Nagwa

Lesson Video: Word Problems: Putting Objects Together Mathematics • Kindergarten

In this video, we will learn how to solve problems with numbers up to 10 to find the total when two groups of objects are combined.

12:29

Video Transcript

Word Problems: Putting Objects Together

In this video, we’ll learn how to solve problems with numbers up to 10. We’re going to find a total when one or more objects are added to a group. A word problem is exactly how it sounds. It’s a maths problem that’s been written in words. We’re going to have a go at answering some word problems. But before we do, let’s remind ourselves of four things we can do to help.

Number one, we need to read the problem carefully. Sometimes when a problem’s being written in words, it’s easy to make a mistake or to miss something out. Reading the problem carefully means reading it slowly and perhaps reading it more than once. This way, we can make sure we understand what it says. The second thing we can do as we read our problem carefully is to look out for hints. Often, we can find words that’ve been used in the problem that will give us a clue as to how to work out the answer. For example, we might see the words, what is the total? And this might give us a clue that we need to add to find the answer.

If we can, it’s always useful to act out or model the problem. This is the third thing we can do to help ourselves. For example, we could use maths equipment to help us understand what the question is asking.

The last thing that we can do is to turn our word problem into a number sentence that we can solve. And once we’ve written our number sentence, we can then find the answer and solve the problem. Do you think you can use these four steps to solve some problems? Let’s have a go.

Daniel read this addition story. There are three strawberry candies and three lemon candies. Pick the model that matches the story. How many candies are there? Three plus three equals what?

Here, we’ve been given a problem that’s written in words. It’s a word problem. Let’s begin by reading it really carefully to find out what we have to do. To start with, we’re told that Daniel read this addition story, and then we’re given the story. There are three strawberry candies and three lemon candies. Perhaps he’s looked in his bag of sweets and he can see what’s in there. It might be a good idea to underline these two amounts because they could be important — three strawberry candies, three lemon candies.

The next sentence of our word problem asks us to pick the model that matches the story. And underneath, we can see two part–whole models that have been drawn for us, but only one of them matches the story. Which one? In the first model, we can count one, two, three, four, five, six candies in the first circle. And there aren’t any candies in the second circle. This part–whole model would show us a problem that involved adding six and zero together.

In our second model, we can see the first circle contains one, two, three candies. And our second circle or second part contains one, two, another three candies. In other words, our part–whole model shows three plus three, the total of three and three. Now, which of these models represents three strawberry candies and three lemon candies? It’s the model that shows three plus three. And in the final part of our problem, we need to find the total. How many candies are there? It asks. Three plus three equals what? Our word problem has been written as a number sentence.

Let’s model the number sentence using counters to help us find the answer. We could even use different colored counters to help us remember that these are strawberry and lemon flavored. So what is the total of three and another three? Well, we already know we have one group of three, so let’s count on another three from that. Three, four, five, six. We’ve used addition to put two groups of objects together. The correct model is the one that shows three candies and another three candies. And we’ve found the number of candies altogether by adding three and three together. And the answer is six.

David has four black cats and two white cats. How many cats does he have in total? Find the matching number sentence. Four plus two equals five, three plus two equals five, four plus two equals six, or four plus three equals seven.

Let’s start by reading through our word problem again carefully so that we understand what it’s asking us. To begin with, we’re told that David has four black cats and two white cats. Let’s underline these numbers; they could be useful. And underneath, we can see a picture of David’s four black cats and two white cats. And then we’re asked, how many cats does he have in total? There’s a clue in this question which tells us what we need to do to find the answer. When we find the total of something, we need to add to find the answer. So in this problem, we need to add together four and two.

Let’s model the problem. We could use black and white cubes, couldn’t we? Four black cubes representing the four black cats and then two white cubes representing our two white cats. So to find the number of cats that David has in total, we need to add on another two to four. This means we can just count on from four. We know we have four black cubes, so we then have five, six cubes altogether. David has a total of six cats. Although our problem was in words, we can represent it using a number sentence. And we need to find the matching number sentence. Do you remember what we did to find the answer? We added together four and two.

Out of the different additions, we can see that only two of them show four plus two. But which one’s correct? Four plus two equals five or four plus two equals six. We’ve already found the answer, so we know that the matching number sentence is four plus two equals six. David has six cats in total, and the matching number sentence is four plus two equals six.

Ethan bought five blue pens and two green pens. How many pens does he have in total? Find the matching number sentence. Three plus five equals eight, five plus two equals seven, five plus two equals six, or five plus four equals nine.

Let’s take our time and read through this word problem again. Ethan bought five blue pens and two green pens. Let’s underline these two amounts; they’re going to come in useful later on. The question continues, how many pens does he have in total? And we know, of course, that that word “total” means that we’re going to have to add to find the answer. We need to find how many pens Ethan has altogether. This is an addition word problem. We’re putting two groups of objects together. Let’s model the problem. We could use a part–whole model using counters. Five blue counters to represent Ethan’s five blue pens. And we can use two green counters to represent his two green pens.

And the question is asking us, how many counters are we going to need to put in this top circle of our part–whole model? In other words, how many pens did Ethan have in total? Let’s move our counters one by one into that top circle. And we’ll count them as we do. Altogether, Ethan is going to have one, two, three, four, five, six, seven pens. We solved the word problem by modeling it using counters. Five blue pens plus another two green pens makes seven pens in total. We can also show our word problem as a number sentence.

And in the second part of the question, we’re asked to find the matching number sentence. Which number sentence shows us that five blue pens and two green pens makes a total of seven pens? Well, it’s this one here, isn’t it? Ethan has seven pens in total. And the matching number sentence is five plus two equals seven.

There are three black sheep and five white sheep in a field. How many sheep are in the field?

Let’s start by reading through our word problem again. To begin with, we’re told that there are three black sheep and five white sheep in a field. And the question then asks us, how many sheep are in the field? We know that there are three black sheep and five white sheep, but the question’s asking us, how many sheep there are altogether? How could we find the answer? What do we need to do? Well, we could start by just doing a quick sketch so that we understand what the question is asking us. Here are three black sheep. You don’t have to be able to draw a sheep to be able to answer the question. These look just like clouds with legs, don’t they? But they’ll do.

Three black sheep and five white sheep. To find out the total number of sheep in the field, we need to add three and five together. Three plus five equals what? Let’s use a number track to help us find the answer. We could start with the number three, this represents our three black sheep, and then count on another five. One, two, three, four, five. We’ve ended on the number eight. We’ve used addition to add two groups of sheep together. Three plus five equals eight.

What have we learned in this video? We’ve learned how to solve word problems with numbers up to 10. And we’ve done this by finding the total, when one or more objects are added to a group.

Download the Nagwa Classes App

Attend sessions, chat with your teacher and class, and access class-specific questions. Download the Nagwa Classes app today!

Nagwa uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn more about our Privacy Policy