Video: Using Repeated Addition to Multiply by 5

There are 6 bunches of carrots. There are 5 carrots in each bunch. How many carrots are there altogether?

01:50

Video Transcript

There are six bunches of carrots. There are five carrots in each bunch. How many carrots are there altogether?

To help us with this problem, we’re given a picture that shows us each bunch of carrots and also a calculation, five plus five plus five plus five plus five plus five equals something. Why are we adding five each time? We need to add five because there are five carrots in each of these bunches.

How many times do we need to add five? We’re told that there are six bunches of carrots. So, we need to add five six times to find six groups of five. When we add the same number lots and lots of times, it looks like quite a long calculation. Another way of writing exactly the same thing is as a multiplication, six multiplied by five.

What is six multiplied by five? Let’s skip count in fives six times to find the answer. Five, 10, add another five gives us 15, that’s three fives, 20, 25, and 30. Five, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, and so we can say five plus five plus five plus five plus five plus five equals 30. Six multiplied by five equals 30. And so, whichever method we use, we can say there are 30 carrots altogether.

Nagwa uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn more about our Privacy Policy.