Video: Modeling Word Problems with Part-Whole Diagrams

Sophia was counting the coins in her money box. She had 62 coins. 29 of them were quarters and the rest were dimes. She wants to know how many dimes are in her money box. Which part-part-whole diagram represents this problem?

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Video Transcript

Sophia was counting the coins in her money box. She had 62 coins. 29 of them were quarters and the rest were dimes. She wants to know how many dimes are in her money box. Which part-part-whole diagram represents this problem?

We’re given two possible answers to this problem. But what’s the same and what’s different about the two diagrams? Well, firstly, both diagrams show a whole amount that’s labelled, and this is made up of two parts, and they’re coloured blue and orange on our diagrams. Also, both diagrams show that 29 is part of the whole. These are the 29 quarters that the problem tells us that Sophia has.

But a big difference is how these diagrams represent the number 62. Is it the whole amount or is it part of the whole? Let’s read the question again to find out. Sophia was counting the coins in her money box. She had 62 coins. This is talking about the total amount of coins Sophia has because we find out that 29 of them are quarters and the rest are dimes. So the whole is worth 62. So we can see now which of the two diagrams is correct.

The total number of coins or the whole amount is 62. Part of the whole are the 29 quarters that Sophia has, and the rest are dimes. And Sophia wants to know what this other part is worth. And so the part-part-whole diagram that represents this problem is this one.

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