Video: Unit Fractions of Shapes in Real World Contexts

Mason had a whole chocolate bar. What could the chocolate bar look like after he has eaten one-sixth of it?

02:12

Video Transcript

Mason had a whole chocolate bar. What could the chocolate bar look like after he has eaten one-sixth of it?

If we look more closely at the chocolate bar, we can see it has been divided into six equal parts or six equal pieces. Each equal part or piece of chocolate is worth one-sixth of the chocolate bar. We have to think about what the chocolate bar could look like after he has eaten one-sixth of it. Could the chocolate bar look like this? This bar has three pieces of chocolate left or three-sixths of chocolate left. That would mean Mason had eaten three-sixths. So, this is not the right picture.

This piece of chocolate is four-sixths. If Mason started with a whole chocolate bar, that means he started with six-sixths. If he ate one or took one away, he would be left with five-sixths. So, we’re looking for a piece of chocolate that has five-sixths left. How many sixths does this bar of chocolate have? This piece is also four-sixths.

This bar of chocolate has five pieces left or five-sixths. Mason had a whole chocolate bar. He had six-sixths. If he eats one-sixth, his chocolate bar could look like this. He would have five-sixths left. One whole or six-sixths take away one-sixth equals five-sixths.

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