Question Video: Identifying the Biological Process That Causes the Movement of Water from the Roots to the Leaves of a Plant | Nagwa Question Video: Identifying the Biological Process That Causes the Movement of Water from the Roots to the Leaves of a Plant | Nagwa

Question Video: Identifying the Biological Process That Causes the Movement of Water from the Roots to the Leaves of a Plant Biology • Second Year of Secondary School

What is the biological process that causes the continuous movement of water from the roots to the leaves of a plant?

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Video Transcript

What is the biological process that causes the continuous movement of water from the roots to the leaves of a plant?

Water is absorbed through the roots of a plant. However, all of the cells of the plant, even at the very top, need access to water. The leaves also particularly need water in order to conduct photosynthesis. So, how does the water get there? Water evaporates from the plant through small pores in the leaves called stomata. As water evaporates into the atmosphere, forces between water molecules in the plant’s vascular system will pull the entire water column up to take the place of the lost molecules.

This process of water loss is called transpiration and is the main contributor to the continuous movement of water from the roots in the soil all the way up to the leaves. In this way, water can travel 200, even 300, feet high to the tops of the tallest trees.

So, the correct answer to this question is transpiration. The biological process that causes the continuous movement of water from the roots to the leaves of a plant is transpiration.

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