Question Video: Identifying the Kingdom Introduced into the Six-Kingdom Classification System Biology

In the late 1970s, a six kingdom model of classification was proposed. Which of the following kingdoms is in the six kingdoms but not the five kingdoms proposed by Whittaker? [A] Archaea [B] Protista [C] Monera [D] Animalia [E] Plantae

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Video Transcript

In the late 1970s, a six-kingdom model of classification was proposed. Which of the following kingdoms is in the six kingdoms but not the five kingdoms proposed by Whittaker? (A) Archaea, (B) Protista, (C) Monera, (D) Animalia, (E) Plantae.

This question asks about the difference between six-kingdom and five-kingdom models of classification. So what are these classifications? Why are they different?

Let’s start by discussing Whittaker’s system of classification. Robert Whittaker was an American ecologist that proposed the five-kingdom classification of life in 1969. These kingdoms include Monera, which includes all prokaryotic life; Protista, which includes eukaryotic unicellular life and simple cellular colonies; Plantae; Fungi; and Animalia.

In 1977, Carl Woese proposed the six-kingdom model of classification. This is very similar to that of Whittaker, with one key difference. Prokaryotic life is divided into two groups, Eubacteria and Archaebacteria.

In summary, Protista, Fungi, Animalia, and Plantae are all in both the five- and six-kingdom models of classification. Woese divided Whittaker’s fifth kingdom, Monera, into two kingdoms known as Archaea and Eubacteria.

Therefore, the option that identifies which kingdom is present in the six-kingdom model of classification but not the five-kingdom model is given by answer choice (A), Archaea.

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