Question Video: Finding the Difference between Two Observations by Reading a Bar Graph Mathematics • 2nd Grade

Some students ate bananas, strawberries, or kiwis at a picnic. The given bar graph shows how many students ate each type of fruit. How many more students ate strawberries than bananas?

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Video Transcript

Some students ate bananas, strawberries, or kiwis at a picnic. The given bar graph shows how many students ate each type of fruit. How many more students ate strawberries than bananas?

In this question, we’re given a bar graph to read, and it’s all about a school picnic. We’re told that the students at the picnic ate bananas, strawberries, or kiwis. We’re also told why this bar graph is there for. It shows us how many students ate each type of fruit. And there are two types of fruit that we need to think about particularly here because we’re asked how many more students ate strawberries than bananas.

This is a comparing question. We need to compare the bars that show the number of students that ate strawberries with bananas. And if we look at the labels at the bottom of our graph, we can see that these are the first two bars. And if we look at the side of our graph, we can see a scale that goes up in ones, and it’s labeled “Number of Students.” This is where we’re going to find the information from that we need. So, let’s see how many students ate each type of fruit.

First, the bananas. So, we’ll go all the way to the top of the bar that represents bananas. And we’ll either use a ruler or we’ll trace across with our finger until we hit the scale. It’s the same height as the number six. So, we can say six students ate bananas. And we could label this bar with a six just to remind us. And if we do exactly the same with the bar that represents strawberries, we can see that 10 students ate strawberries on the picnic. You see, it’s level with the number 10. So to find out how many more students ate strawberries and bananas, we can just work out a subtraction. 10 take away six equals four. And so, we can say that the difference between 10 and six is four. Four more students ate strawberries than bananas.

You know, there’s another way we could have solved this problem. Because we know that each line on the graph is worth one, we could have counted how many jumps it takes to get us from the top of the bar that represents bananas to the one that represents strawberries. The difference is one, two, three, four. So that’s interesting, isn’t it? It’s a way to find the answer without actually reading across to the scale on the side. Well, we’ve used two different methods, and we found the same answer both times. At the picnic, four more students ate strawberries than bananas.

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