Video: Comparing Groups of Objects: Equal

In this video, we will learn how to compare two groups of up to 5 objects to see if they are equal using a matching strategy.

05:24

Video Transcript

Comparing Groups of Objects: Equal

In this video, we will learn how to compare groups of up to five objects to see if they’re equal. To do this, we’re going to use a matching strategy.

Here, we have two groups of socks. Are the groups equal? Equal groups have the same number of objects. Does each group have the same number of socks? To help us find out if the groups are equal, we could try to match the socks. We could match these two socks because they have the same pattern. And we could also match these two socks. We matched all the socks in the first group. But we have an odd sock in the second group. There’s one more sock left over. The second group has more socks. These two groups of socks are not equal. The second group has more socks.

In this picture, we have a group of leaves and a group of caterpillars. Are the two groups equal? We can match the first leaf to the first caterpillar. And we can match the second leaf to the second caterpillar. Each caterpillar has a leaf. The groups are equal.

Let’s practise comparing groups of objects to see if they’re equal, using the matching strategy.

Are there the same number of paint brushes as paint palettes?

Here, we have a group of paint palettes and a group of paint brushes. We have to find out if the number of paint palettes is equal to the number of paint brushes. We can match the first palette to a paint brush. And we can match the second palette to a paint brush. And the third palette also has a brush. Each paint palette has a brush. So, we have the same number of paint brushes as palettes. The number in each group is equal. So, the answer to the question are there the same number of paint brushes as paint palettes is yes. We were able to match each palette to a brush.

Does the number of balls equal the number of rackets?

The picture shows a group of tennis rackets and a group of tennis balls. The question is asking if each group is equal. In other words, are there the same number of rackets as tennis balls? To help us answer this question, we could try and match the balls to the rackets. The first racket has a ball. The second racket has a ball. So does the third racket, the fourth racket. But there’s no racket for this tennis ball. This means the number of balls and rackets are not equal. We have more tennis balls than rackets. So, the answer to the question does the number of balls equal the number of rackets is no. There are more tennis balls than tennis rackets.

Is there a blouse for each skirt?

Let’s try matching the blouses to the skirts. There’s a blouse for the first skirt. We can match the second skirt to this blouse. And we can match this skirt and this blouse. But there’s no blouse for this skirt. There isn’t a blouse for each skirt because there are more skirts than blouses. We still have one skirt left over. So, the answer to the question is there a blouse for each skirt is no. There are more skirts than blouses.

In this video, we have learned we can compare two groups to see if they’re equal using matching.

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