Question Video: Understanding the Functional Flow of Information in the Human Nervous System | Nagwa Question Video: Understanding the Functional Flow of Information in the Human Nervous System | Nagwa

Question Video: Understanding the Functional Flow of Information in the Human Nervous System Biology • Second Year of Secondary School

Which of the following diagrams correctly outlines the functioning of the human nervous system? [A] Diagram A [B] Diagram B [C] Diagram C [D] Diagram D

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Video Transcript

Which of the following diagrams correctly outlines the functioning of the human nervous system? (A), which shows a diagram that starts with receiving information from external or internal stimuli then processing information then coordinating a response and ends with maintaining homeostasis. (B), which shows a diagram that starts with receiving information from external stimuli then receiving information from internal stimuli then coordinating a response and ends with processing information. (C), which shows a diagram that starts with receiving information from external or internal stimuli then coordinating a response then processing information and ends with maintaining homeostasis. (D), which shows a diagram that starts with disrupting homeostasis then processing information then coordinating a response and ends with receiving information from external or internal stimuli.

This question is asking us to recall the function of the human nervous system and use the recalled information to identify the diagram that correctly demonstrates how information flows through the nervous system. The human nervous system is responsible for our abilities to sense and respond to the environments both externally and internally.

To efficiently sense, process, and then respond to internal and external environments, the human nervous system can be divided into subdivisions, each with their own specific structural and functional characteristics. The human nervous system is composed of two main divisions: the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system. Use of the root word “periphery” in the peripheral nervous system is to describe the nervous system structures that are beyond the brain and the spinal cord. This describes one of the main functions of the peripheral system, which is to collect sensory information from internal and external environments.

The function of collecting sensory information is carried out by the afferent nerves of the peripheral nervous system. The collected sensory information then travels to the central nervous system which comprises the brain and the spinal cord. Within the central nervous system, the brain processes and coordinates a response to the collected sensory information. Then the motor commands from the brain are sent to the efferent nerves of the peripheral nervous system to carry out the motor response.

Together, these subdivisions of the nervous system maintain a fairly stable environment internally, which is called homeostasis and is very important to maintaining the biological functions of the human body. So the correct diagram will list the functions of the human nervous system as first collecting sensory information, which is performed by the peripheral nervous system, then processing and coordinating a response, which is performed by the central nervous system, and ends with the goal of maintaining homeostasis.

Now that we have reviewed how signals are received, processed, and responded to in the human nervous system, we are able to answer our question correctly. The diagram that correctly outlines the function of the human nervous system starts with receiving information from external or internal stimuli then processing information then coordinating responses and ends with maintaining homeostasis.

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