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Video: Calculating the Experimental Probability to Find the Expected Number of Outcomes

Bethani Gasparine

The table shows the results from a survey where 20 students from a school were asked to pick their favorite fruit from 3 options. By calculating the experimental probability that a student’s favorite fruit is an orange, calculate how many of the 400 students in the school, would choose an orange as their favorite.

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Video Transcript

The table shows the results from a survey, where 20 students from a school were asked to pick their favorite fruit from three options. By calculating the experimental probability that a student’s favorite fruit is orange, calculate how many of the four hundred students in the school would choose an orange as their favorite.

Since there were 20 students in the survey and eight of them choose the orange as their favorite fruit, eight out of 20 would choose the fruit orange, which reduces to two-fifths because eight is divisible by four and 20 is divisible by four.

So in order to calculate how many of the 400 students in the school would choose an orange as their favorite, we need to take 400 times two-fifths. This means 160 students out of the 400 students in the school would choose an orange as their favorite, based on this experimental probability.