Reading Exercise: Top Tips for Staying Cool When Starting a New School English •

In this excercise, we will practise reading for gist, detail, and specific information in the context of starting at a new school.

Top Tips for Staying Cool When Starting a New School

Are you stressed about starting your new school? Worried you won’t make any new friends? Don’t know where to turn to for advice? Then stop and let Teen Magazine help you with some top tips for staying cool when starting a new school!

1. Make a Plan for Your First Day

Before you start, make sure you know how to get to school from your new home address. Whether you’re walking, travelling to school by bus, or being dropped off by your parents in the car, be certain you know where you’re going, so you don’t get lost. If you’re travelling by bus, go online and check the bus timetable. The night before, pack your rucksack with all the things you’ll need for the first day: textbooks, pens, pencils, and your uniform for physical education. Also, don’t forget your lunch money! When you get to school, make sure you get a map showing you the school layout from the reception area. This will help you find where your classes are. You wouldn’t want to be late for your first lessons, would you?

2. Be Confident, Smile, and Be Friendly

It’s not easy being a teenager, but when you’re feeling anxious, try to stay calm. You’ll find it much easier to talk to new people and study hard if you do. If you start feeling stressed, take a few deep breaths. Everyone has some unique abilities and strengths: maybe you’re a star pupil, an expert football player, or the kind student who always stands up to bullies. Although you may be different from everyone else, you’ll always find friends who appreciate what it is that makes you special. So, stay positive! However, if you start to feel lonely or if someone is bullying you, then it might be time to talk to a teacher about the problem before it gets too serious.

3. Start Conversations with Other Students

It’s always difficult making friends, but if you don’t try starting conversations with other students, you will struggle to make new ones. In class, try talking to the students who sit nearest to you. Make sure you do this before the lesson starts; you don’t want to make the teacher angry! Lunchtimes are a good time to socialise with other students. Some great ways to start a conversation include asking them what their favourite subject is, what their hobbies are, and what films and music they like. After you’ve started your conversation, listen carefully to what they’re saying. Once you feel a connection, why not give your new friend a compliment, share a video of something you’re interested in, or ask them if they want to be friends with you on social media? (Not all at once though!) Remember, don’t be too pushy by asking people personal questions straight away! It takes time to get to know people.

4. Stay Connected and Try an Extracurricular Activity

Do you want to find out what’s going on at your school outside of the classroom and get involved? Try reading the school noticeboard to see what events and activities are happening in the coming months. The school noticeboard will also include an information about any extracurricular activities the school hosts, such as team sports, debate clubs, and voluntary activities. Doing sports, such as football, volleyball, and cricket, is a great way of meeting new friends. If sports aren’t your favourite thing, then you could consider joining a debate club. In debate clubs, you can practice your conversational skills, such as giving your opinion about something and being polite, such as taking turns when speaking. Joining the debate club at your school will also make you feel more confident when speaking to other students. In addition, your school noticeboard may contain adverts for volunteering opportunities that you can get involved with, such as helping out a local charity.

Reading for Gist

Q1:

Who wrote this text?

  • AMany teenagers
  • BSomeone working for Teen Magazine
  • CTeen Magazine
  • DSome concerned parents
  • EA teacher

Q2:

Which image best summarises the information in the second paragraph?

  • A
    Image
  • B
    Image
  • C
    Image
  • D
    Image
  • E
    Image

Q3:

Which image best summarises the information in the third paragraph?

  • A
    Image
  • B
    Image
  • C
    Image
  • D
    Image
  • E
    Image

Q4:

Which sentence best summarises the fourth paragraph?

  • AThe fourth paragraph is about making new friends by talking to people.
  • BThe fourth paragraph is about good ways to start a conversation.
  • CThe fourth paragraph is about listening to others.
  • DThe fourth paragraph is about making friends during lunchtime.
  • EThe fourth paragraph is about sharing media, like videos, and making friends on social media.

Q5:

Which sentence from the fifth paragraph best summarises it?

  • A“Doing sports, such as football, volleyball, and cricket, is a great way of meeting new friends.”
  • B“[F]ind out what’s going on at your school outside of the classroom and get involved.”
  • C“Read […] the school noticeboard.”
  • D“In debate clubs, you can practice your conversational skills.”
  • E“[S]uch as helping out a local charity”

Reading for Detail and Specific Information

Q6:

The writer asks, “Are you stressed about starting your new school?” Who is the writer talking to?

  • AOnly students about to start a new school
  • BTeachers that work at a school
  • CPeople who read other magazines, but not Teen Magazine
  • DA reader of this article, mostly teenagers
  • EParents of students about to start a new school

Q7:

In the first paragraph, what emotions describe a student about to start a new school?

  • AHappiness and contentment
  • BFear and uncertainty
  • CStress and worry
  • DRelaxedness and calmness
  • EAnger and resentment

Q8:

How many types of transport does the text suggest for travelling to school?

  • AThree types of transport
  • BThree transports
  • CTwo transports
  • DTwo types of transport
  • ENo type of transport is suggested.

Q9:

What does the text recommend doing the night before the reader starts a new school?

  • APacking a pen and a pencil
  • BChecking the bus timetable
  • CMaking sure
  • DGoing on the internet
  • EPacking a rucksack

Q10:

Does the text advise the reader to take money to school to help make new friends?

  • AYes, it does.
  • BNo, money is never mentioned in the text.
  • CNo, the text says to bring money to school to buy lunch.
  • DYes, money can be used to make friends.
  • ENo, the text says that money can’t be used to make friends.

Q11:

What do you need to pick up from the school reception on your first day?

  • ATextbooks, pens, and pencils
  • BA map of the school
  • CThe school layout
  • DWhere your classes are
  • EA physical education uniform

Q12:

What does everyone have?

  • AA star pupil
  • BAn expert football player
  • CFriends
  • DUnique skills and abilities
  • EEveryone is different.

Q13:

If a student is being bullied, what does the text suggest they do?

  • AThey should speak to a teacher.
  • BThey should call the police.
  • CThey should feel lonely.
  • DThey should talk about the problem with the bully.
  • EThey should talk about the problem with the police.

Q14:

Why should you try to speak with a student sitting next to you before a lesson starts?

  • ABecause you have no friends
  • BBecause you want to socialise
  • CBecause you want to make new friends
  • DBecause the teacher will get angry if you interrupt the lesson
  • EBecause lessons are important

Q15:

During the school day, when is it a good time to make new friends?

  • AOn social media
  • BWhen reading the school noticeboard
  • CDoing a team sport after school finishes
  • DJoining the debate club
  • EIn class, before the lesson starts

Q16:

When you feel a connection with a student you are speaking to, what can you do?

  • AAsk to be friends on social media, share a video with them, or compliment them
  • BAsk them to be friends on social media only
  • CShare a video with them, ask to be friends on social media, and compliment them
  • DShare a video with them whilst complimenting them and then ask to be friends on social media
  • EAsk them to be friends with you

Q17:

What are all the extracurricular activities that the school noticeboard can give you information about?

  • ADebate clubs
  • BHelping out a local charity
  • CFootball, volleyball, and cricket
  • DTeam sports, debate clubs, and voluntary activities
  • EEvents and activities

Q18:

What conversational skills does the text say you will develop when joining a debate club?

  • ATaking turns and being polite
  • BPractising conversation
  • CGiving an opinion and being polite
  • DFeeling more confident and being polite
  • ETaking turns and feeling more confident

Q19:

What does “do” refer to in “You’ll find it much easier to talk to new people if you do”?

  • ATalk to new people
  • BStay calm
  • CFeel anxious
  • DStudy hard
  • EFeel stressed

Q20:

What does “in addition” mean in the sentence “In addition, your school noticeboard may contain adverts …”?

  • AGiving a reason
  • BCreating a contrast
  • CAdding something
  • DStrengthening an idea
  • EShowing results

Reading for Vocabulary and Grammar

Q21:

Look closely at the text above; what is a word with a similar meaning to cool?

  • AWorried
  • BAngry
  • CStressed
  • DAnxious
  • ECalm

Q22:

Look closely at the text above; what is a word with the opposite meaning to negative?

  • ADifferent
  • BUnique
  • CAngry
  • DPositive
  • EInterested

Q23:

Look closely at the text above; what is a word with the opposite meaning to public?

  • APrivate
  • BSocial
  • CExtracurricular
  • DVoluntary
  • EUnique

Q24:

Look closely at the text above; what is a word with the opposite meaning to unkind?

  • ANew
  • BKind
  • CPolite
  • DSocial
  • EInterested

Q25:

What does the word physical mean in the text above?

  • AIt means “relating to nature.”
  • BIt means “a scientific field of study.”
  • CIt means “relating to the mind.”
  • DIt means “a scientific subject studied at school.”
  • EIt means “relating to the body.”

Q26:

In the below example, what is the underlined word?

An expert football player

  • AA quantifier
  • BThe definite article
  • CThe indefinite article
  • DA pronoun
  • EA preposition

Q27:

In the below example from the text, is there a mistake in the underlined section?

The school noticeboard will also include an information.

  • AYes, it should be “a information.”
  • BYes, there is a mistake; it should be “the information.”
  • CNo, “an information” is correct.
  • DNo, there is no mistake, because “information” is a count noun and can be used with the indefinite article.
  • EYes, there is a mistake, because “information” is an uncountable noun and cannot be used with the indefinite article.

Q28:

In the below example from the text, how can you tell the underlined word is a countable noun?

What their hobbies are

  • AThe underlined word has a plural “-s” ending, as seen in other plural forms like “cats” and “dogs”; and when a noun has a plural form, it is countable.
  • BThe underlined word is the plural form of “hobbie,” and when a noun has a plural form, it is countable.
  • CThe underlined word is the plural form of “hobby,” and when a noun has a plural form, it is countable.
  • DActually, this is not a countable noun!
  • EIt is countable, but there are no clues about why this is a countable noun.

Correct Answer

Incorrect Answer

Nagwa uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn more about our Privacy Policy.

;